Event Title

Understanding Prisoner Reentry: Employment, Parenting and Relationships Matter

Location

D34000

Start Date

1-4-2016 11:15 AM

End Date

1-4-2016 12:10 PM

Description

The portrait of incarceration in America is deeply disturbing. The United States ranks number one in the world for its unprecedented rate of incarceration (Pew Charitable Trust, 2012). No other ethnic group is caught more in the grasp of the enduring legacy of mass incarceration than African American, inner-city, poor, men, women and children. African Americans represent 13.1% of the total U.S. population, but comprise approximately 36% (549,100) of America’s prison population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2013; BJS, 2013). The impact of mass incarceration on Black America is further compounded by the challenges of prisoner reentry.

“Reentry is the process of leaving prison and returning to society” (Travis, 2005, p. xxi). This panel will address three components of the challenges of reentry: employment, re-establishing intimate relationships and the reconnection to parenting. Clearly, the personal, family and community costs associated with mass incarceration greatly exceeds investment in social programs that provide opportunities for stable employment, restoration of parenting and strengthened intimate relationships. Based on research conducted by the panelists, this presentation will explore the challenges associated with prisoner reentry and the opportunities to promote successful community reintegration after incarceration.

Comments

Ms. Vickii Coffey, ABD, MSA is an Instructor of Social Work, Ms. Lori Crowder, ABD, MSW, LCSW is an Instructor of Social Work, and Dr. Giesela Grumbach, Ph.D., MSW, LCSW is an Assistant Professor of Social Work in the College of Health and Human Services.

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Apr 1st, 11:15 AM Apr 1st, 12:10 PM

Understanding Prisoner Reentry: Employment, Parenting and Relationships Matter

D34000

The portrait of incarceration in America is deeply disturbing. The United States ranks number one in the world for its unprecedented rate of incarceration (Pew Charitable Trust, 2012). No other ethnic group is caught more in the grasp of the enduring legacy of mass incarceration than African American, inner-city, poor, men, women and children. African Americans represent 13.1% of the total U.S. population, but comprise approximately 36% (549,100) of America’s prison population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2013; BJS, 2013). The impact of mass incarceration on Black America is further compounded by the challenges of prisoner reentry.

“Reentry is the process of leaving prison and returning to society” (Travis, 2005, p. xxi). This panel will address three components of the challenges of reentry: employment, re-establishing intimate relationships and the reconnection to parenting. Clearly, the personal, family and community costs associated with mass incarceration greatly exceeds investment in social programs that provide opportunities for stable employment, restoration of parenting and strengthened intimate relationships. Based on research conducted by the panelists, this presentation will explore the challenges associated with prisoner reentry and the opportunities to promote successful community reintegration after incarceration.