Event Title

The Effects of Quantitative EEG (qEEG) Driven Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) EEG Biofeedback on Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Location

D1497

Start Date

1-4-2016 9:35 AM

End Date

1-4-2016 9:50 AM

Description

Children and adolescents with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD) often experience significant disturbances in sleep onset and maintenance. Emerging research has demonstrated a link between ADHD and sleep disorders and its effect upon daytime sleepiness, behavior and cognitive functions such as attention and memory. To date, there are limited evidenced based approaches in the field of occupational therapy that are directed at improving sleep in children and ADHD. Management of sleep disorders has the potential for reducing the severity of behavioral symptoms and improving daily life function. The purpose of this study is to explore the use of EEG low resolution electromagnetic tomography z score biofeedback as an intervention to improve the neurobiological process related to sleep onset and maintenance and subsequent changes in daytime functioning in male and female children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder, subtypes hyperactivity or mixed. This study is proposed to evaluate the effects of an EEG biofeedback intervention on participation in the occupation of sleep and resulting impact on daily function in the areas of behavior and cognition. Sleep is an emerging area of practice in the field of occupational therapy and there are limited evidenced based approaches that address sleep physiology as a means of improving engagement in the occupation of sleep. The use of a preparatory as well as adjunctive intervention in the form of EEG imaging and biofeedback has the potential of being a valid approach that can enhance sleep latency and sleep duration, potentially improving participation in the occupation of sleep and promoting improved daytime functioning.

Comments

Ms. Linda Marshall-Kramer is a graduate student in the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program, College of Health and Human Services.

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Apr 1st, 9:35 AM Apr 1st, 9:50 AM

The Effects of Quantitative EEG (qEEG) Driven Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) EEG Biofeedback on Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

D1497

Children and adolescents with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD) often experience significant disturbances in sleep onset and maintenance. Emerging research has demonstrated a link between ADHD and sleep disorders and its effect upon daytime sleepiness, behavior and cognitive functions such as attention and memory. To date, there are limited evidenced based approaches in the field of occupational therapy that are directed at improving sleep in children and ADHD. Management of sleep disorders has the potential for reducing the severity of behavioral symptoms and improving daily life function. The purpose of this study is to explore the use of EEG low resolution electromagnetic tomography z score biofeedback as an intervention to improve the neurobiological process related to sleep onset and maintenance and subsequent changes in daytime functioning in male and female children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder, subtypes hyperactivity or mixed. This study is proposed to evaluate the effects of an EEG biofeedback intervention on participation in the occupation of sleep and resulting impact on daily function in the areas of behavior and cognition. Sleep is an emerging area of practice in the field of occupational therapy and there are limited evidenced based approaches that address sleep physiology as a means of improving engagement in the occupation of sleep. The use of a preparatory as well as adjunctive intervention in the form of EEG imaging and biofeedback has the potential of being a valid approach that can enhance sleep latency and sleep duration, potentially improving participation in the occupation of sleep and promoting improved daytime functioning.