Event Title

Child Development and Family Factors

Location

D1496

Start Date

1-4-2016 1:40 PM

End Date

1-4-2016 1:55 PM

Description

STUDY I: Based on the differential susceptibility hypothesis, inhibited infants were hypothesized to be more affected by parents' personality than infants who are less inhibited. In the sample of 985 mother-child dyads in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care data set, maternal agreeableness and education positively predicted children's peer status. The differential susceptibility hypothesis was supported. Analyses using the HHS Study of Fathers sample of 339 couples and children participating in the NICHD study also found support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis.

STUDY 2: This study explored whether infant inhibition predicted children's peer status in kindergarten. The two aspects of personality that may be most likely to interact with inhibition are neuroticism and agreeableness to predict peer status. In the sample of 985 mother-child dyads in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care, maternal agreeableness and education positively predicted peer status. Infant inhibition and maternal personality did not interact. In the HHS Study of Fathers subsample of 339 fathers and children participating in the NICHD study, paternal education predicted peer status. When mothers were included in the model with fathers, maternal agreeableness predicted peer status and paternal and maternal education no longer predicted peer status. The results of the study do not support either the dual risk hypothesis or the differential susceptibility hypothesis. The sample of mothers and children was large enough to provide sufficient power to detect interactions.

Book Project: Narratives from parents or primary caregivers on child behaviors are currently being collected for a compilation book. This book will include amusing collected narratives of observed behaviors of children 0-5 years old. The book will also explain, in plain language, the developmental significance of such behaviors and provide resources for additional reading.

Comments

Dr. Alli Cipra is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in the College of Education.

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Apr 1st, 1:40 PM Apr 1st, 1:55 PM

Child Development and Family Factors

D1496

STUDY I: Based on the differential susceptibility hypothesis, inhibited infants were hypothesized to be more affected by parents' personality than infants who are less inhibited. In the sample of 985 mother-child dyads in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care data set, maternal agreeableness and education positively predicted children's peer status. The differential susceptibility hypothesis was supported. Analyses using the HHS Study of Fathers sample of 339 couples and children participating in the NICHD study also found support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis.

STUDY 2: This study explored whether infant inhibition predicted children's peer status in kindergarten. The two aspects of personality that may be most likely to interact with inhibition are neuroticism and agreeableness to predict peer status. In the sample of 985 mother-child dyads in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care, maternal agreeableness and education positively predicted peer status. Infant inhibition and maternal personality did not interact. In the HHS Study of Fathers subsample of 339 fathers and children participating in the NICHD study, paternal education predicted peer status. When mothers were included in the model with fathers, maternal agreeableness predicted peer status and paternal and maternal education no longer predicted peer status. The results of the study do not support either the dual risk hypothesis or the differential susceptibility hypothesis. The sample of mothers and children was large enough to provide sufficient power to detect interactions.

Book Project: Narratives from parents or primary caregivers on child behaviors are currently being collected for a compilation book. This book will include amusing collected narratives of observed behaviors of children 0-5 years old. The book will also explain, in plain language, the developmental significance of such behaviors and provide resources for additional reading.