Event Title

I’ll Do it Later: Understanding the Role of Procrastination and Self Control in Consumer Behavior

Location

D34000

Start Date

1-4-2016 10:35 AM

End Date

1-4-2016 10:50 AM

Description

Dan Ariely (2009) discusses the problem of procrastination and self-control: why we cannot make ourselves do what we want to do. He defines procrastination as giving up on our long term goals for immediate gratification. So, in other words, we would rather have instant satisfaction than wait for the benefits to take their time and arrive. He also connects this to the idea of self-control, the ability to control oneself (emotions and desires) in the expression of his/her behavior. For example, when someone else gives orders or deadlines, we jump to attention thus strengthening our self-control. Both of these concepts are important topics for marketing. Marketing is essentially based on understanding customer needs and behaviors to deliver consumer satisfaction. Presumably, when consumers have lower self-control, they are more likely to buy items on impulse. However, consumers who have higher self-control may be rational in their purchases, think whether or not they need the item and then decide. Likewise, marketers can evaluate how consumers behave when they procrastinate. Productivity, doing, and accomplishing are all highly valued norms and procrastination violates these norms. In education, prior research shows students do procrastinate and tightly restricting their freedom is likely to cure the problem. To extend the research, I want to study how other people may influence a person’s procrastination behavior. For example, children may learn to procrastinate when they observe their parent’s procrastination behavior. The effect of parental procrastination behaviors on children is an understudied area of research.

Comments

Dr. Pam Mohanty is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Ms. Tailor Harms is an undergraduate student in Business Administration in the College of Business.

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Apr 1st, 10:35 AM Apr 1st, 10:50 AM

I’ll Do it Later: Understanding the Role of Procrastination and Self Control in Consumer Behavior

D34000

Dan Ariely (2009) discusses the problem of procrastination and self-control: why we cannot make ourselves do what we want to do. He defines procrastination as giving up on our long term goals for immediate gratification. So, in other words, we would rather have instant satisfaction than wait for the benefits to take their time and arrive. He also connects this to the idea of self-control, the ability to control oneself (emotions and desires) in the expression of his/her behavior. For example, when someone else gives orders or deadlines, we jump to attention thus strengthening our self-control. Both of these concepts are important topics for marketing. Marketing is essentially based on understanding customer needs and behaviors to deliver consumer satisfaction. Presumably, when consumers have lower self-control, they are more likely to buy items on impulse. However, consumers who have higher self-control may be rational in their purchases, think whether or not they need the item and then decide. Likewise, marketers can evaluate how consumers behave when they procrastinate. Productivity, doing, and accomplishing are all highly valued norms and procrastination violates these norms. In education, prior research shows students do procrastinate and tightly restricting their freedom is likely to cure the problem. To extend the research, I want to study how other people may influence a person’s procrastination behavior. For example, children may learn to procrastinate when they observe their parent’s procrastination behavior. The effect of parental procrastination behaviors on children is an understudied area of research.