Event Title

Rhizosphere Interactions: A Study of Tree Root Exudates Across Species

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

1-4-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

1-4-2016 6:00 PM

Description

Plant roots exude a variety of soluble substances. Besides the release of ions, as well as oxygen and water, root exudates mainly consist of carbon-containing compounds, such as sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. These exudates are known to play important roles in a number of rhizosphere processes, including nutrient acquisitions, plant-microbe associations, regulation of plant growth and development, accumulation of soil organic matter, and determination of microbial community structure in the plant rhizosphere. However, our mechanistic understanding of these processes is incomplete. In this present project, the root exudate and extract compositions of white oak (Quercus alba) and common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) samplings will be investigated as a necessary first step in identification of below ground processes which may contribute to the invasive tendencies of buckthorn and suppression of oaks- a keystone species in the Chicago Wilderness region. Quantification of these interactions may provide direction for restoration efforts aimed at preserving the integrity of local ecological resources.

Comments

Dr. Xiaoyong Chen is a Professor of Science and Ms. Lisa Schwarz is a graduate student in Environmental Science in the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Apr 1st, 4:00 PM Apr 1st, 6:00 PM

Rhizosphere Interactions: A Study of Tree Root Exudates Across Species

Hall of Governors

Plant roots exude a variety of soluble substances. Besides the release of ions, as well as oxygen and water, root exudates mainly consist of carbon-containing compounds, such as sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. These exudates are known to play important roles in a number of rhizosphere processes, including nutrient acquisitions, plant-microbe associations, regulation of plant growth and development, accumulation of soil organic matter, and determination of microbial community structure in the plant rhizosphere. However, our mechanistic understanding of these processes is incomplete. In this present project, the root exudate and extract compositions of white oak (Quercus alba) and common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) samplings will be investigated as a necessary first step in identification of below ground processes which may contribute to the invasive tendencies of buckthorn and suppression of oaks- a keystone species in the Chicago Wilderness region. Quantification of these interactions may provide direction for restoration efforts aimed at preserving the integrity of local ecological resources.