Event Title

Impact of a Conductive Education Intervention on Supraspinal Structures in Adults with Chronic Stroke

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

1-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

1-4-2016 12:00 PM

Description

The location and severity of damage to the brain after a stroke influences the extent of functional limitations experienced by the stroke survivor. After injury, measurable physiological changes continue that can be correlated with functional clinical measures. With physical rehabilitation interventions, functional impairments can be lessened, presumably through mechanisms of neuroplasticity. Though interventions are often effective for restoring at least partial function for individuals with stroke, little is known about what underlies the positive results for specific interventions. The purpose of this URG-funded pilot study was to assess changes in neurological structure and connectivity in adults with chronic stroke after participation in a novel cognitive-physical rehabilitation intervention program known as Conductive Education (CE). Subjects: Four adults with chronic (>6mo) stroke, 5+yrs post outpatient rehabilitation. Intervention: weekly, 2-hour CE program sessions for 10 weeks. Before and after CE program participation, measures of function (via clinical assessment by a licensed physical therapist) and supraspinal neurological structures (via imaging) were obtained. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were collected to assess functional and structural connectivity, myelin concentration, and cerebral perfusion. Clinical assessment measures and imaging data were analyzed for pre/post intervention changes. MRI data revealed pontine-level lesions (n = 2/4) and subcortical lesions (n = 2/4). Results showed that changes in both physical function and imaging outcomes varied by individual but were similar for subjects with similar lesions. From this pilot study, we conclude that CE could be effective for adults with chronic stroke by inducing supraspinal changes measurable with emerging imaging techniques.

Comments

Dr. Renee Theiss is an Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy and Dr. Roberta O’Shea is a Professor of Physical Therapy in the College of Health and Human Services. Mr. Todd Parrish is affiliated with Northwestern Medicine Radiology of Chicago, Illinois.

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Apr 1st, 10:00 AM Apr 1st, 12:00 PM

Impact of a Conductive Education Intervention on Supraspinal Structures in Adults with Chronic Stroke

Hall of Governors

The location and severity of damage to the brain after a stroke influences the extent of functional limitations experienced by the stroke survivor. After injury, measurable physiological changes continue that can be correlated with functional clinical measures. With physical rehabilitation interventions, functional impairments can be lessened, presumably through mechanisms of neuroplasticity. Though interventions are often effective for restoring at least partial function for individuals with stroke, little is known about what underlies the positive results for specific interventions. The purpose of this URG-funded pilot study was to assess changes in neurological structure and connectivity in adults with chronic stroke after participation in a novel cognitive-physical rehabilitation intervention program known as Conductive Education (CE). Subjects: Four adults with chronic (>6mo) stroke, 5+yrs post outpatient rehabilitation. Intervention: weekly, 2-hour CE program sessions for 10 weeks. Before and after CE program participation, measures of function (via clinical assessment by a licensed physical therapist) and supraspinal neurological structures (via imaging) were obtained. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were collected to assess functional and structural connectivity, myelin concentration, and cerebral perfusion. Clinical assessment measures and imaging data were analyzed for pre/post intervention changes. MRI data revealed pontine-level lesions (n = 2/4) and subcortical lesions (n = 2/4). Results showed that changes in both physical function and imaging outcomes varied by individual but were similar for subjects with similar lesions. From this pilot study, we conclude that CE could be effective for adults with chronic stroke by inducing supraspinal changes measurable with emerging imaging techniques.