Event Title

Using Environmental DNA from Domestic Cats to Analyze Population Genetics

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

1-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

1-4-2016 12:00 PM

Description

Population genetics is an important part of conservation biology. DNA is traditionally obtained from direct sampling of organisms. In cat species, this can be difficult due to their reclusive nature, the time required to capture and sample individuals, and may be a potentially dangerous encounter to both the cat and the sampler. Environmental DNA (eDNA) is commonly found in water sources from organisms that interact with them. While eDNA has been used to detect individuals, it has not been widely used in population genetics studies. Here, we attempt to determine the viability of eDNA as a source for population genetics studies. We will analyze domestic cat population genetics through the use of eDNA collected from cat drinking water.

Comments

Dr. Erin Grey is an Assistant Professor of Biology and Mr. John Stechly is a graduate student in Environmental Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 1st, 10:00 AM Apr 1st, 12:00 PM

Using Environmental DNA from Domestic Cats to Analyze Population Genetics

Hall of Governors

Population genetics is an important part of conservation biology. DNA is traditionally obtained from direct sampling of organisms. In cat species, this can be difficult due to their reclusive nature, the time required to capture and sample individuals, and may be a potentially dangerous encounter to both the cat and the sampler. Environmental DNA (eDNA) is commonly found in water sources from organisms that interact with them. While eDNA has been used to detect individuals, it has not been widely used in population genetics studies. Here, we attempt to determine the viability of eDNA as a source for population genetics studies. We will analyze domestic cat population genetics through the use of eDNA collected from cat drinking water.