Event Title

Exploring the Value of Interdependence as Perceived by OT Practitioners

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

7-4-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

7-4-2017 1:30 PM

Description

Independence has been the “cornerstone of occupational therapy,” as an ultimate goal. In America, dependence is viewed as something to treat in order to regain independence. However, emphasizing autonomy and independence can lead to separation from others. Alternatively, “interdependence is based on the premise that people are naturally interactive and rely on social networks for survival” throughout life. Interdependence is the reciprocal relationship where help and support are offered and received. Interdependence can empower clients to adapt and manage their health condition in their environment, continuing their community residence instead of being institutionalized. Further research is needed to discover the meaning and use of interdependence within occupational therapy (OT).

The aim of this study is to understand the underlying assumptions and perceptions of interdependence by occupational therapy practitioners (OTPs) who work with culturally diverse populations. The results of the study will provide needed information for future OTPs when working with populations that value interdependence. This study will increase the evidence based knowledge and efficacy of working with these populations, with the goal of creating models of care that emphasize social support networks and interdependent relationships.

The results indicate four main themes: Independence as valued by clients; family involvement in care can be either negative or positive; the differing values of OTPs and clients; and interdependence. The emerging themes under interdependence were protocol, disconnect, cultural dimensions, education, reciprocity, support and client-centered.

Comments

Lee Anna Bailey, Kimberly Chambers, Kimberly Knight, Cynthia McCormack, Heather O’Keefe, and Lasis Yusuf are students of Dr. Elizabeth Wanka, Assistant Profesor of Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Human Services.

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Apr 7th, 12:30 PM Apr 7th, 1:30 PM

Exploring the Value of Interdependence as Perceived by OT Practitioners

Hall of Governors

Independence has been the “cornerstone of occupational therapy,” as an ultimate goal. In America, dependence is viewed as something to treat in order to regain independence. However, emphasizing autonomy and independence can lead to separation from others. Alternatively, “interdependence is based on the premise that people are naturally interactive and rely on social networks for survival” throughout life. Interdependence is the reciprocal relationship where help and support are offered and received. Interdependence can empower clients to adapt and manage their health condition in their environment, continuing their community residence instead of being institutionalized. Further research is needed to discover the meaning and use of interdependence within occupational therapy (OT).

The aim of this study is to understand the underlying assumptions and perceptions of interdependence by occupational therapy practitioners (OTPs) who work with culturally diverse populations. The results of the study will provide needed information for future OTPs when working with populations that value interdependence. This study will increase the evidence based knowledge and efficacy of working with these populations, with the goal of creating models of care that emphasize social support networks and interdependent relationships.

The results indicate four main themes: Independence as valued by clients; family involvement in care can be either negative or positive; the differing values of OTPs and clients; and interdependence. The emerging themes under interdependence were protocol, disconnect, cultural dimensions, education, reciprocity, support and client-centered.