Event Title

Physical Therapy for a patient post stroke with symptoms of Pusher syndrome in a 91-year-old male: A retrospective case report

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

7-4-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

7-4-2017 6:00 PM

Description

According to the Center for Disease Control, in the United States, more than 795,000 people have a stroke every year. In an estimated 5% of patients that experience a stroke, a clinical disorder called "Pusher syndrome" can develop. This syndrome can be observed when a patient uses their non-paretic extremities to push away from the non-paretic side.

The cause for this postural shift phenomenon called Pusher syndrome is not fully understood. Investigations have found that patients that experience Pusher syndrome understand their body as being oriented as upright, despite having normal functioning visual-vestibular systems. Supplementary investigations propose that the shift is postural alignment is due to graviceptive neglect that is related to impaired processing of somesthetic graviceptive information.

This case report describes the physical therapy treatment of a patient post stroke with symptoms of Pusher syndrome in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. The patient was previously independent with ambulation and ADLs and had a severe decline in functional status post CVA. With the lack of current research regarding Pusher syndrome, this case offers insight into clinical decision making regarding patients with these symptoms.

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Apr 7th, 4:00 PM Apr 7th, 6:00 PM

Physical Therapy for a patient post stroke with symptoms of Pusher syndrome in a 91-year-old male: A retrospective case report

Hall of Governors

According to the Center for Disease Control, in the United States, more than 795,000 people have a stroke every year. In an estimated 5% of patients that experience a stroke, a clinical disorder called "Pusher syndrome" can develop. This syndrome can be observed when a patient uses their non-paretic extremities to push away from the non-paretic side.

The cause for this postural shift phenomenon called Pusher syndrome is not fully understood. Investigations have found that patients that experience Pusher syndrome understand their body as being oriented as upright, despite having normal functioning visual-vestibular systems. Supplementary investigations propose that the shift is postural alignment is due to graviceptive neglect that is related to impaired processing of somesthetic graviceptive information.

This case report describes the physical therapy treatment of a patient post stroke with symptoms of Pusher syndrome in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. The patient was previously independent with ambulation and ADLs and had a severe decline in functional status post CVA. With the lack of current research regarding Pusher syndrome, this case offers insight into clinical decision making regarding patients with these symptoms.