Event Title

The Effect of Low-Technology Assistive Devices on Gait Training a 58 Year-Old Woman Post-Stroke: A Case Report

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

1-4-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

1-4-2016 6:00 PM

Description

Background and Purpose: Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA), commonly referred to as stroke, is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. An estimated 25% of patients begin rehabilitation following stroke with mobility deficits, and thus a major focus of post stroke physical therapy is to improve the strength and neuromuscular coordination in an attempt to normalize activity performance. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) have been identified as interventions with potential to positively impact gait, but many clinics have limited resources, which prohibits the use of higher-technological devices. The purpose of this case report is to explore the use of low-technology assistive devices for post stroke gait training in an urban rehabilitation setting.

Case Description: The patient was a 58-year old African American female who presented to inpatient rehabilitation status post right Anterior Cerebral Artery (ACA) stroke. The patient’s prior medical history included untreated hypertension, asthma, tobacco use and cocaine abuse. Impairments included left lower extremity weakness, decreased balance and functional mobility, and impulsivity.

Outcomes: The patient demonstrated improvements in the following outcome measure: Manual Muscle testing, FIM scores and Berg Balance Scale. The patient met her goals for ambulation distance and stair negotiation.

Discussion: The patient participated in a variety of interventions, so improvements could not be attributed solely to the use of low-technology assistive devices. The results of this case report show potential for further research into the effectiveness of low-technology assistive devices as efficient, economical alternatives to high-technology options.

Comments

Ms. Anna Albrecht is a graduate student in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, College of Health and Human Services.

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Apr 1st, 4:00 PM Apr 1st, 6:00 PM

The Effect of Low-Technology Assistive Devices on Gait Training a 58 Year-Old Woman Post-Stroke: A Case Report

Hall of Governors

Background and Purpose: Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA), commonly referred to as stroke, is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. An estimated 25% of patients begin rehabilitation following stroke with mobility deficits, and thus a major focus of post stroke physical therapy is to improve the strength and neuromuscular coordination in an attempt to normalize activity performance. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) have been identified as interventions with potential to positively impact gait, but many clinics have limited resources, which prohibits the use of higher-technological devices. The purpose of this case report is to explore the use of low-technology assistive devices for post stroke gait training in an urban rehabilitation setting.

Case Description: The patient was a 58-year old African American female who presented to inpatient rehabilitation status post right Anterior Cerebral Artery (ACA) stroke. The patient’s prior medical history included untreated hypertension, asthma, tobacco use and cocaine abuse. Impairments included left lower extremity weakness, decreased balance and functional mobility, and impulsivity.

Outcomes: The patient demonstrated improvements in the following outcome measure: Manual Muscle testing, FIM scores and Berg Balance Scale. The patient met her goals for ambulation distance and stair negotiation.

Discussion: The patient participated in a variety of interventions, so improvements could not be attributed solely to the use of low-technology assistive devices. The results of this case report show potential for further research into the effectiveness of low-technology assistive devices as efficient, economical alternatives to high-technology options.