Event Title

Successful Methods for Toothbrush Sanitation: An In-Vitro Study pf Common Disinfectant’s Effects on Escherichia Coli Viability

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

7-4-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

7-4-2017 1:30 PM

Description

Toothbrush hygiene has received little attention for its role in human oral health. Untreated toothbrushes in holders in normal bathroom settings have been implicated in causing repeated infections of the mouth. Research has indicated that toothbrushes in regular use can become heavily contaminated with various microorganisms. Patients with suppressed immune systems are at great risk for infection. Thus, this study aims to examine various methods for toothbrush sanitation. Because of the proximity to potential aerosols released from toilette flushing, Escherichia coli (E. coli). was used to test the effectiveness of various treatments. Sterile toothbrushes were contaminated by a standardized suspension of E. coli In order to determine the most effective tooth brush treatment the following disinfectants were tested: 20% concentrated salt water, 3% hydrogen peroxide, Listerine, 5% white vinegar and tap water (control group). Bacterial colony counts were obtained from Petrifilm E. coli/Coliform count plates. Colony forming units per toothbrush of E. coli after disinfection were compared by One- way Analysis of Variance and Turkey-Kramer test for multiple comparisons. Results revealed 3% hydrogen peroxide, 30% white vinegar and 20% sodium chloride to be most effective at lowering E. coli viable counts when compared to control and other disinfection methods viability. Statistically lower numbers for the hydrogen peroxide and vinegar treatments, with NaCl showing some significant drop in viability were indicated. Although susceptible to these treatments, common mouthwash was similar to water controls. More studies should be completed with easily assessable, non-toxic antimicrobial agents to determine a standardized home disinfection routine.

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Apr 7th, 12:30 PM Apr 7th, 1:30 PM

Successful Methods for Toothbrush Sanitation: An In-Vitro Study pf Common Disinfectant’s Effects on Escherichia Coli Viability

Hall of Governors

Toothbrush hygiene has received little attention for its role in human oral health. Untreated toothbrushes in holders in normal bathroom settings have been implicated in causing repeated infections of the mouth. Research has indicated that toothbrushes in regular use can become heavily contaminated with various microorganisms. Patients with suppressed immune systems are at great risk for infection. Thus, this study aims to examine various methods for toothbrush sanitation. Because of the proximity to potential aerosols released from toilette flushing, Escherichia coli (E. coli). was used to test the effectiveness of various treatments. Sterile toothbrushes were contaminated by a standardized suspension of E. coli In order to determine the most effective tooth brush treatment the following disinfectants were tested: 20% concentrated salt water, 3% hydrogen peroxide, Listerine, 5% white vinegar and tap water (control group). Bacterial colony counts were obtained from Petrifilm E. coli/Coliform count plates. Colony forming units per toothbrush of E. coli after disinfection were compared by One- way Analysis of Variance and Turkey-Kramer test for multiple comparisons. Results revealed 3% hydrogen peroxide, 30% white vinegar and 20% sodium chloride to be most effective at lowering E. coli viable counts when compared to control and other disinfection methods viability. Statistically lower numbers for the hydrogen peroxide and vinegar treatments, with NaCl showing some significant drop in viability were indicated. Although susceptible to these treatments, common mouthwash was similar to water controls. More studies should be completed with easily assessable, non-toxic antimicrobial agents to determine a standardized home disinfection routine.