Event Title

The Greek Debt Crisis and Rural Resistance and Resilience – 2009 – 2017

Location

D1497

Start Date

7-4-2017 10:50 AM

End Date

7-4-2017 11:20 AM

Description

Since 2008 Greece has received considerable attention over the national debt crisis and restructuring of the Greek economy pursuant to “bailout” funding provided by the International Monetary Fund, The Central European Bank, and the European Commission – the group known as the Troika. The bailout and restructuring program have given way pensions cuts, increased taxes, the collapse of the banking systems, capital controls, political instability, high unemployment (especially among young adults) to name a few economic and social dislocations. Largely overlooked in the Greek national and international bodies (the Troika) overseeing the implementation of the restructuring program is the role of the family farm system and rural villages in sustaining Greek local and national economic interests and social institutions. This presentation is part of a wider ethnographic project largely focused on women’s roles in sustaining Greek village life. The study examines how Greek rural women in synergistic relationships with their husbands and extended family members respond to losses in household income and support resulting from the Troika demands to meet the terms of restricting the Greek economy.

Comments

Dr. Frances Kostarelos is Professor of Anthropology and Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences

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Apr 7th, 10:50 AM Apr 7th, 11:20 AM

The Greek Debt Crisis and Rural Resistance and Resilience – 2009 – 2017

D1497

Since 2008 Greece has received considerable attention over the national debt crisis and restructuring of the Greek economy pursuant to “bailout” funding provided by the International Monetary Fund, The Central European Bank, and the European Commission – the group known as the Troika. The bailout and restructuring program have given way pensions cuts, increased taxes, the collapse of the banking systems, capital controls, political instability, high unemployment (especially among young adults) to name a few economic and social dislocations. Largely overlooked in the Greek national and international bodies (the Troika) overseeing the implementation of the restructuring program is the role of the family farm system and rural villages in sustaining Greek local and national economic interests and social institutions. This presentation is part of a wider ethnographic project largely focused on women’s roles in sustaining Greek village life. The study examines how Greek rural women in synergistic relationships with their husbands and extended family members respond to losses in household income and support resulting from the Troika demands to meet the terms of restricting the Greek economy.