Location

D1497

Start Date

1-4-2016 2:40 PM

End Date

1-4-2016 2:55 PM

Description

The goal of this research is to determine if honeybees are competing with native bees in tallgrass prairie restorations in Illinois and Indiana. Honeybees are a non-native species and recently honey been hives have been introduced to restorations without a systematic measured approach and thorough research into their effects on native bee populations and ecosystems. To test for evidence of competition between honeybees and native bees, data was gathered that would help in determining: 1) if nectar resources are limiting; 2) native bees have decreased pollen loads; and 3) species composition and foraging heights of native bees differ in sites with an introduced honeybee hive vs. sites without honeybee hives. Only one field season’s worth of data has been collected, thus no conclusions can be drawn until the second field season is completed.

Comments

Dr. Mary Carrington is a Professor in Biology and Environmental Biology and Mr. Neal Jankowski is a graduate student in Environmental Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 1st, 2:40 PM Apr 1st, 2:55 PM

The Effect of Honeybees on Native Bee Communities in Northeastern Illinois and Northwestern Indiana Tallgrass Prairie Restorations

D1497

The goal of this research is to determine if honeybees are competing with native bees in tallgrass prairie restorations in Illinois and Indiana. Honeybees are a non-native species and recently honey been hives have been introduced to restorations without a systematic measured approach and thorough research into their effects on native bee populations and ecosystems. To test for evidence of competition between honeybees and native bees, data was gathered that would help in determining: 1) if nectar resources are limiting; 2) native bees have decreased pollen loads; and 3) species composition and foraging heights of native bees differ in sites with an introduced honeybee hive vs. sites without honeybee hives. Only one field season’s worth of data has been collected, thus no conclusions can be drawn until the second field season is completed.