Research Day 2018 Schedule

Event Title

Isolation and Characterization of Phthalate-Degrading Bacteria from the Asian Carp Microbiomes and Riverine Sediments

Location

D1496

Start Date

4-6-2018 1:10 PM

End Date

4-6-2018 1:40 PM

Abstract

Approximately 800 million pounds of phthalates are produced worldwide each year and due to their widespread distribution, phthalates have become ubiquitous in aquatic environments. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) as top priority pollutants due to their pervasive abundance and toxicity. The biodegradation of phthalates has been extensively investigated leading to the discovery of numerous phthalate-degrading bacteria from many types of environments; however there is a lack of studies demonstrating if aquatic organisms can act as a source for isolating phthalate-degrading bacteria. Non-native Asian carp species bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) residing in contaminated environments absorb phthalates into muscle tissue and intake organic pollutants while feeding on plankton and benthic algae. Phthalate-degrading bacteria isolated from the microbiome and scale biofilm of both Asian carp species exhibited similar degradation kinetics to phthalate-degrading bacteria isolated from contaminated riverine sediments. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of phthalate-degrading enrichments inoculated with silver carp microbiomes and riverine sediments shared dominant genera of Pseudomonas. One-way ANOVA test applied to the mean alpha diversity of contaminated sediment and the silver carp microbiome revealed significant differences (PBacillus subtilis strain degrading DEP (1000 mg/L) within 44 hours and a diverse consortium isolated from the silver carp microbiome degrading DMP, DEP, and DBP. The study demonstrates that Asian carp can act as a source for isolating phthalate-degrading bacteria.

Identify Grant

University Research Grant

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Apr 6th, 1:10 PM Apr 6th, 1:40 PM

Isolation and Characterization of Phthalate-Degrading Bacteria from the Asian Carp Microbiomes and Riverine Sediments

D1496

Approximately 800 million pounds of phthalates are produced worldwide each year and due to their widespread distribution, phthalates have become ubiquitous in aquatic environments. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) as top priority pollutants due to their pervasive abundance and toxicity. The biodegradation of phthalates has been extensively investigated leading to the discovery of numerous phthalate-degrading bacteria from many types of environments; however there is a lack of studies demonstrating if aquatic organisms can act as a source for isolating phthalate-degrading bacteria. Non-native Asian carp species bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) residing in contaminated environments absorb phthalates into muscle tissue and intake organic pollutants while feeding on plankton and benthic algae. Phthalate-degrading bacteria isolated from the microbiome and scale biofilm of both Asian carp species exhibited similar degradation kinetics to phthalate-degrading bacteria isolated from contaminated riverine sediments. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of phthalate-degrading enrichments inoculated with silver carp microbiomes and riverine sediments shared dominant genera of Pseudomonas. One-way ANOVA test applied to the mean alpha diversity of contaminated sediment and the silver carp microbiome revealed significant differences (PBacillus subtilis strain degrading DEP (1000 mg/L) within 44 hours and a diverse consortium isolated from the silver carp microbiome degrading DMP, DEP, and DBP. The study demonstrates that Asian carp can act as a source for isolating phthalate-degrading bacteria.