Research Day 2018 Schedule

Event Title

"Why Do We Need More Haitians?": America's History of Suppressing Immigrants of Color and Favoritism of European Immigrants from 1819 to 2018

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Aleigh Crowder, Governors State UniversityFollow

Location

D34115

Start Date

4-6-2018 1:10 PM

End Date

4-6-2018 1:40 PM

Other Presentation Disciplines:

Immigration History

Abstract

In a country championed for its premise of “the dream” and nicknamed “the melting pot,” America’s history is riddled with examples of race as a determiner of entry. President Donald Trump’s recent statements about Haitians and African immigrants reflect this sentiment. The Trump administration’s attempts at imposing executive order 13769, repealing DACA, ending temporary protected status for several groups, and refusing low-skilled work visas to Haitians, Samoans, and Belizeans contradict what our country claims to value. The polarity of this value has always existed; evident from the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 to the National Origins Act in 1924. From legislation created to discriminate against different racial groups to the American attitudes towards immigrants of color. When there’s talk about keeping immigrants out, those immigrants are usually of color. Examining immigration legislation proposed from 1819 to 2018, I assert that it has contributed to the preference shown towards white immigrants and the restriction of immigrants of color.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Professor Laura White

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 1:10 PM Apr 6th, 1:40 PM

"Why Do We Need More Haitians?": America's History of Suppressing Immigrants of Color and Favoritism of European Immigrants from 1819 to 2018

D34115

In a country championed for its premise of “the dream” and nicknamed “the melting pot,” America’s history is riddled with examples of race as a determiner of entry. President Donald Trump’s recent statements about Haitians and African immigrants reflect this sentiment. The Trump administration’s attempts at imposing executive order 13769, repealing DACA, ending temporary protected status for several groups, and refusing low-skilled work visas to Haitians, Samoans, and Belizeans contradict what our country claims to value. The polarity of this value has always existed; evident from the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 to the National Origins Act in 1924. From legislation created to discriminate against different racial groups to the American attitudes towards immigrants of color. When there’s talk about keeping immigrants out, those immigrants are usually of color. Examining immigration legislation proposed from 1819 to 2018, I assert that it has contributed to the preference shown towards white immigrants and the restriction of immigrants of color.