Poster Sessions - 2018 Research Day

Event Title

The Impact of Intensive Inpatient Rehabilitation for a Patient with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Following an Exacerbation: A Retrospective Case Report

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-6-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

4-6-2018 5:30 PM

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurological diseases in the United States, with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) being the most prevalent form, involving recurrent exacerbations that result in residual impairments between episodes. Limited research exists for effective physical therapy (PT) interventions for patients with MS immediately following a relapse or exacerbation. Therefore, the purpose of this retrospective case report was to describe the impact of an individualized and intensive inpatient PT program for a patient with RRMS immediately following an exacerbation. The patient in this case report was a 64-year-old male who presented to an inpatient facility with RRMS following toxic encephalopathy secondary to polypharmacy. The patient completed 60-90 minutes of skilled physical therapy per day for a total of 10 days in the inpatient rehabilitation facility. The patient showed considerable progress in functional mobility as measured by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Based on the patient’s functional impairments, PT treatment sessions included safety awareness, patient education, therapeutic exercise (lower extremity strengthening and stretching), neuromuscular re-education (balance/coordination training and postural education/facilitation), functional training (bed mobility training, transfer training using a rolling walker, gait training using a rolling walker, stair training, curb transfer training, wheelchair mobility) and fall recovery. Performed interventions were individualized and unique to this particular patient, thus these interventions should be not generalized to all individuals with MS. Further research involving studies with an extended rehabilitation period and/or a follow-up assessment would help contribute to validated treatment methods for patients with RRMS following an exacerbation

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Apr 6th, 4:00 PM Apr 6th, 5:30 PM

The Impact of Intensive Inpatient Rehabilitation for a Patient with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Following an Exacerbation: A Retrospective Case Report

Hall of Governors

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurological diseases in the United States, with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) being the most prevalent form, involving recurrent exacerbations that result in residual impairments between episodes. Limited research exists for effective physical therapy (PT) interventions for patients with MS immediately following a relapse or exacerbation. Therefore, the purpose of this retrospective case report was to describe the impact of an individualized and intensive inpatient PT program for a patient with RRMS immediately following an exacerbation. The patient in this case report was a 64-year-old male who presented to an inpatient facility with RRMS following toxic encephalopathy secondary to polypharmacy. The patient completed 60-90 minutes of skilled physical therapy per day for a total of 10 days in the inpatient rehabilitation facility. The patient showed considerable progress in functional mobility as measured by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Based on the patient’s functional impairments, PT treatment sessions included safety awareness, patient education, therapeutic exercise (lower extremity strengthening and stretching), neuromuscular re-education (balance/coordination training and postural education/facilitation), functional training (bed mobility training, transfer training using a rolling walker, gait training using a rolling walker, stair training, curb transfer training, wheelchair mobility) and fall recovery. Performed interventions were individualized and unique to this particular patient, thus these interventions should be not generalized to all individuals with MS. Further research involving studies with an extended rehabilitation period and/or a follow-up assessment would help contribute to validated treatment methods for patients with RRMS following an exacerbation