Poster Sessions - 2018 Research Day

Event Title

Iconic Domains @ GSU: Ethnographic Research

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-6-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

4-6-2018 2:00 PM

Abstract

In ANTH4600 Ethnographic Methods we learned how to methodically study the environment around us. The domains the class observed include the Governors State University D entrance, the cafeteria, and Alumni Path. We conducted mapping, structured observations, and used cameras to observe and record data. The photos in this presentation were selected from a collection of about two hundred photos taken by students in field. The photos were discussed and evaluated in class in the light of the American Anthropology Association Ethics guidelines, lessons gleaned from class readings concerning representing culture, and field notes. This poster represents everyday and iconic artifacts the class discovered and recorded in the field.

During that experience, we learned how to observe our surroundings and record data. We engaged in reflective and reflexive writing exercises. As a result of this field experience we were able to see familiar campus domains from a point of view that we had previously overlooked. The field work, recorded observations, and this representation of campus culture give way to several questions worthy of further ethnographic inquiry including concerns about waste and recycling, transportation, food security, preservation, sense of place and placelessness among other topics.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Professor Frances Kostarelos

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Apr 6th, 12:30 PM Apr 6th, 2:00 PM

Iconic Domains @ GSU: Ethnographic Research

Hall of Governors

In ANTH4600 Ethnographic Methods we learned how to methodically study the environment around us. The domains the class observed include the Governors State University D entrance, the cafeteria, and Alumni Path. We conducted mapping, structured observations, and used cameras to observe and record data. The photos in this presentation were selected from a collection of about two hundred photos taken by students in field. The photos were discussed and evaluated in class in the light of the American Anthropology Association Ethics guidelines, lessons gleaned from class readings concerning representing culture, and field notes. This poster represents everyday and iconic artifacts the class discovered and recorded in the field.

During that experience, we learned how to observe our surroundings and record data. We engaged in reflective and reflexive writing exercises. As a result of this field experience we were able to see familiar campus domains from a point of view that we had previously overlooked. The field work, recorded observations, and this representation of campus culture give way to several questions worthy of further ethnographic inquiry including concerns about waste and recycling, transportation, food security, preservation, sense of place and placelessness among other topics.