Poster Sessions - 2018 Research Day

Event Title

Functional Outcomes for a Patient with West Nile Virus Encephalitis Receiving Physical Therapy in the Long Term Acute Care Hospital: A Case Report

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-6-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

4-6-2018 5:30 PM

Abstract

Background and Purpose: West Nile virus (WNV) was first introduced into the United States in 1999 and continues to be an annual epidemic, particularly in the Midwest region. Approximately 1% of WNV cases are neuroinvasive. The subtypes of neuroinvasive WNV include encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy plan of care and functional outcomes for a 54 year old female patient with West Nile virus encephalitis in the long term acute care hospital (LTACH).

Case Description: The patient was a 54 year old Caucasian woman in good health who became acutely ill. The patient was diagnosed with West Nile virus encephalitis with respiratory failure and presented with debility, weakness and flaccid paralysis in her left upper extremity. She was admitted to the long term acute care hospital for ventilator weaning and physical therapy was introduced to address the patient’s functional limitations.

Outcomes: After receiving care for 19 days and participating in 9 physical therapy treatment sessions, the patient’s functional status improved from being dependent for standing and non-ambulatory to ambulating 24 feet with a rolling walker. There was a clinically significant improvement in the patient’s AM-PAC “6-Clicks” Basic Mobility score and an improvement in her FIM score, although not clinically significant. Following care in the LTACH, the patient advanced to an acute inpatient rehabilitation facility.

Discussion: The patient’s improvements in bed mobility and transfers are promising indicators that functional mobilization helped increase endurance and strength necessary for these activities. Further research may help determine preferred treatment options for patients with West Nile encephalitis (WNE) and the possibility of post-West Nile virus poliomyelitis syndrome.

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Apr 6th, 4:00 PM Apr 6th, 5:30 PM

Functional Outcomes for a Patient with West Nile Virus Encephalitis Receiving Physical Therapy in the Long Term Acute Care Hospital: A Case Report

Hall of Governors

Background and Purpose: West Nile virus (WNV) was first introduced into the United States in 1999 and continues to be an annual epidemic, particularly in the Midwest region. Approximately 1% of WNV cases are neuroinvasive. The subtypes of neuroinvasive WNV include encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy plan of care and functional outcomes for a 54 year old female patient with West Nile virus encephalitis in the long term acute care hospital (LTACH).

Case Description: The patient was a 54 year old Caucasian woman in good health who became acutely ill. The patient was diagnosed with West Nile virus encephalitis with respiratory failure and presented with debility, weakness and flaccid paralysis in her left upper extremity. She was admitted to the long term acute care hospital for ventilator weaning and physical therapy was introduced to address the patient’s functional limitations.

Outcomes: After receiving care for 19 days and participating in 9 physical therapy treatment sessions, the patient’s functional status improved from being dependent for standing and non-ambulatory to ambulating 24 feet with a rolling walker. There was a clinically significant improvement in the patient’s AM-PAC “6-Clicks” Basic Mobility score and an improvement in her FIM score, although not clinically significant. Following care in the LTACH, the patient advanced to an acute inpatient rehabilitation facility.

Discussion: The patient’s improvements in bed mobility and transfers are promising indicators that functional mobilization helped increase endurance and strength necessary for these activities. Further research may help determine preferred treatment options for patients with West Nile encephalitis (WNE) and the possibility of post-West Nile virus poliomyelitis syndrome.