Poster Sessions - 2018 Research Day

Event Title

Preliminary Outcomes from a Mentoring Program for Afrian American females

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Crystal L. Harris, Governors State UniversityFollow

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-6-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-6-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

The concept of “multiple jeopardy” (King, 2007) was coined to expand the term “double jeopardy” (Beale, 1970), and it adequately describes the overwhelming impact of social class marginalization when compounded with experiences of racial and gender bias. Black females facing multiple jeopardy on college campuses are often silenced by institutional barriers and peer pressure especially if they lack sufficient resources to face these barriers. The marginalized treatment includes negative stereotypes, feeling isolated or alienated, experiencing micro insults and invalidation in the classroom, residence halls and accessing campus services.

A four week mentoring program was created to improve our understanding of how race, class and gender intersect in the lives of these students and to assess the students’ self-efficacy with key coping strategies. Throughout the workshop series, techniques and strategies were taught by visiting guest speakers representing distinct career paths and industries based on their unique stories of resilience. Resources were offered to assist students in identifying both internal and systemic barriers, and existing campus resources were highlighted to develop a network of support for students facing challenges to their academic and career goals. Participants participated in an IRB approved study called “Coping with daily stress.” The pre-screening instruments for this study includes: demographic survey questions, Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire (PEDQ), Perceptions of Racism and Oppression Scale (PROS-10), Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), and Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-12). We hypothesize that black female students will have higher scores on perceptions of discrimination and that interpersonal support will mediate the relationship between perceived discrimination and negative affect. Implications for further research, equitable and inclusive teaching and campus programming will also be discussed.

Identify Grant

Funded by Equity and Inclusive Exclusive Excellence Grant.

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Apr 6th, 10:30 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Preliminary Outcomes from a Mentoring Program for Afrian American females

Hall of Governors

The concept of “multiple jeopardy” (King, 2007) was coined to expand the term “double jeopardy” (Beale, 1970), and it adequately describes the overwhelming impact of social class marginalization when compounded with experiences of racial and gender bias. Black females facing multiple jeopardy on college campuses are often silenced by institutional barriers and peer pressure especially if they lack sufficient resources to face these barriers. The marginalized treatment includes negative stereotypes, feeling isolated or alienated, experiencing micro insults and invalidation in the classroom, residence halls and accessing campus services.

A four week mentoring program was created to improve our understanding of how race, class and gender intersect in the lives of these students and to assess the students’ self-efficacy with key coping strategies. Throughout the workshop series, techniques and strategies were taught by visiting guest speakers representing distinct career paths and industries based on their unique stories of resilience. Resources were offered to assist students in identifying both internal and systemic barriers, and existing campus resources were highlighted to develop a network of support for students facing challenges to their academic and career goals. Participants participated in an IRB approved study called “Coping with daily stress.” The pre-screening instruments for this study includes: demographic survey questions, Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire (PEDQ), Perceptions of Racism and Oppression Scale (PROS-10), Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), and Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-12). We hypothesize that black female students will have higher scores on perceptions of discrimination and that interpersonal support will mediate the relationship between perceived discrimination and negative affect. Implications for further research, equitable and inclusive teaching and campus programming will also be discussed.