Event Title

Low income African American women use of technology to acquire health information

Start Date

4-12-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 12:15 PM

Abstract

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in low income minority women. These women are less educated about breast cancer, so it is important to understand the risk of developing breast cancer, family history, and preventable interventions. Minority women are less likely to get a mammograph screening; therefore, implementing interventions will increase mammograph adherence. Previous studies exhibited a relationship with text message reminders and increased mammograph screening, but rarely examined women using technology to search for breast cancer information on their own. The objectives of this study are to (1) analyze and compare results from two focus groups about how they obtain health information, (2) if they use technology to acquire health information such as breast cancer, and (3) identify age gaps related to accessing health information. Is technology beneficial to African American women for acquiring breast cancer information? To address this question, we conducted a mixed methods study. We measured differences using Chi-square test. Women responded to a questionnaire from a previous focus group. Their responses were analyzed and compared to the focus groups from Mercy Hospital. In the sample, there were no significant differences in age in how women access health information. However, women < 40 preferred technology to access health information whereas women ≥40 preferred to received information from a physician. African American women health literacy increases when they use technology to access health information. Technology is becoming an important resource for African American women to understand health information and thus increase mammographic screening rates.

Identify Grant

National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (Award #: 1P20CA202907 and 1P20CA202908).

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Ifeanyi Beverly Chukwudozie, University of Illinois at Chicago Cancer Center

Dr. Kent Hoskins, University of Illinois at Chicago

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Apr 12th, 11:15 AM Apr 12th, 12:15 PM

Low income African American women use of technology to acquire health information

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in low income minority women. These women are less educated about breast cancer, so it is important to understand the risk of developing breast cancer, family history, and preventable interventions. Minority women are less likely to get a mammograph screening; therefore, implementing interventions will increase mammograph adherence. Previous studies exhibited a relationship with text message reminders and increased mammograph screening, but rarely examined women using technology to search for breast cancer information on their own. The objectives of this study are to (1) analyze and compare results from two focus groups about how they obtain health information, (2) if they use technology to acquire health information such as breast cancer, and (3) identify age gaps related to accessing health information. Is technology beneficial to African American women for acquiring breast cancer information? To address this question, we conducted a mixed methods study. We measured differences using Chi-square test. Women responded to a questionnaire from a previous focus group. Their responses were analyzed and compared to the focus groups from Mercy Hospital. In the sample, there were no significant differences in age in how women access health information. However, women < 40 preferred technology to access health information whereas women ≥40 preferred to received information from a physician. African American women health literacy increases when they use technology to access health information. Technology is becoming an important resource for African American women to understand health information and thus increase mammographic screening rates.