Event Title

Biomass and spatial distribution of fine roots in an oak forest

Start Date

4-12-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 11:15 AM

Abstract

Fine roots (< 0.2 cm in diameter) (FR) are the primary part among the root systems for the uptake of water and nutrients, but they are often poorly investigated elements in forest ecosystems. In this study, the vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of FR biomass were investigated in an oak forest in the Field Station of Governors State University, Illinois. Three different sizes individual trees (small, middle and large size trees) were selected in this oak forest and the soil auger was used to take soil samples from three locations (1, 2 and 3 m away from the trunk) along four geographic directions (East, West, North, and South) at 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm depths. Results showed no significant differences of FR biomass were found among the four geographic directions from the trunk for the selected trees (P = 0.7824), and among the three sampling locations (1, 2 and 3 m away from the trunk) of each examined oak tree (P > 0.05). At 0-20 cm soil depth, FR biomass of large tree was significantly different from the small tree (P = 0.03) and from the middle tree (P = 0.007). There was no significant difference of FR biomass between the small tree and the middle tree (P = 0.5237). No significant differences of FR biomass were found among the three examined trees at 20-40 cm depth (P > 0.05). Fine root biomass decreased with increasing soil depths. About 67% of fine root biomass was concentrated at the top soil layer (0-20 cm) in this study forest.

Identify Grant

A 2018 GSU Undergraduate Research Grant to Drs. Xiaoyong Chen and Mary Carrington

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Xiaoyong Chen

Dr. Mary Carrington

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 11:15 AM Apr 12th, 11:15 AM

Biomass and spatial distribution of fine roots in an oak forest

Fine roots (< 0.2 cm in diameter) (FR) are the primary part among the root systems for the uptake of water and nutrients, but they are often poorly investigated elements in forest ecosystems. In this study, the vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of FR biomass were investigated in an oak forest in the Field Station of Governors State University, Illinois. Three different sizes individual trees (small, middle and large size trees) were selected in this oak forest and the soil auger was used to take soil samples from three locations (1, 2 and 3 m away from the trunk) along four geographic directions (East, West, North, and South) at 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm depths. Results showed no significant differences of FR biomass were found among the four geographic directions from the trunk for the selected trees (P = 0.7824), and among the three sampling locations (1, 2 and 3 m away from the trunk) of each examined oak tree (P > 0.05). At 0-20 cm soil depth, FR biomass of large tree was significantly different from the small tree (P = 0.03) and from the middle tree (P = 0.007). There was no significant difference of FR biomass between the small tree and the middle tree (P = 0.5237). No significant differences of FR biomass were found among the three examined trees at 20-40 cm depth (P > 0.05). Fine root biomass decreased with increasing soil depths. About 67% of fine root biomass was concentrated at the top soil layer (0-20 cm) in this study forest.