Event Title

Soil Aggregate Stability and Size Distribution under Different Land Uses in Nachusa Grasslands, Northern Illinois

Start Date

4-12-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 12:15 PM

Other Presentation Disciplines:

Soil property

Abstract

A soil aggregate is a group of primary soil particles that cohere to each other more strongly than to other surrounding particles. Soil aggregates and their stability are fundamental properties and can serve as indicators of soil structure and quality, influencing carbon stabilization, water infiltration, soil compactability, hydraulic conductivity, and the ability to resist water erosion. Land uses and management practices are important factors in affecting soil aggregation through its impact on destruction forces and aggregate forming processes. However, the extent of the impact and the associated mechanisms of land use on soil aggregates remain unclear. In this study, soil aggregates were fractionated into four aggregate classes (>1, 0.25-1, 0.053-0.25, and < 0.053 mm) under four land use types (prairie, savanna, wetland, and woodland) in Nachusa Grasslands, northern Illinois, using a wet-sieving method to obtain the size distribution of soil water-stable aggregates. The main objective of this project was to investigate the influence of land use change on soil aggregate size distribution and aggregate stability. The results showed the fractions of macroaggregates (>0.053 mm) were higher in prairie and woodland soils than that in savanna and wetland sites. In contrast, wetland and savanna had higher proportion of microaggregates (woodland > savanna > wetland. This study suggested the conversion prairie to other plant types would result in decreasing of soil structure and soil quality in study area of Illinois.

Identify Grant

A 2018 Friends of Nachusa Grasslands Scientific Research Grant to Drs. Chen & Carrington.

A 2018 GSU University Research Grant to Drs. Chen & Carrington.

A 2019 GSU University Research Grant to Drs. Chen & Carrington.

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Apr 12th, 11:15 AM Apr 12th, 12:15 PM

Soil Aggregate Stability and Size Distribution under Different Land Uses in Nachusa Grasslands, Northern Illinois

A soil aggregate is a group of primary soil particles that cohere to each other more strongly than to other surrounding particles. Soil aggregates and their stability are fundamental properties and can serve as indicators of soil structure and quality, influencing carbon stabilization, water infiltration, soil compactability, hydraulic conductivity, and the ability to resist water erosion. Land uses and management practices are important factors in affecting soil aggregation through its impact on destruction forces and aggregate forming processes. However, the extent of the impact and the associated mechanisms of land use on soil aggregates remain unclear. In this study, soil aggregates were fractionated into four aggregate classes (>1, 0.25-1, 0.053-0.25, and < 0.053 mm) under four land use types (prairie, savanna, wetland, and woodland) in Nachusa Grasslands, northern Illinois, using a wet-sieving method to obtain the size distribution of soil water-stable aggregates. The main objective of this project was to investigate the influence of land use change on soil aggregate size distribution and aggregate stability. The results showed the fractions of macroaggregates (>0.053 mm) were higher in prairie and woodland soils than that in savanna and wetland sites. In contrast, wetland and savanna had higher proportion of microaggregates (woodland > savanna > wetland. This study suggested the conversion prairie to other plant types would result in decreasing of soil structure and soil quality in study area of Illinois.