Event Title

The Relationship Between Fear Avoidance Behaviors, Self-Efficacy, And Functional Ability In Patients With A Patellar Tendon Rupture: A Retrospective Case Report

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Steffen O'Brien, Governors State UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-12-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 6:00 PM

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Patellar tendon injury is most commonly seen young to middle aged adults who participate in sports or lead an active life style. These patients many times are apprehension and are fearful of reinjury and may avoid return to sports and function. This fearful avoidance and subsequent decrease in self-efficacy are directly related to functional ability of a patient. The purpose of this case study is to investigate the relationship between fear avoidance behaviors, self-efficacy, and functional mobility in a patient who has undergone a patellar tendon repair.

Case description: The patient was a 24-year-old male who was a collegiate soccer athlete at the time of injury. This patient underwent a left knee arthroscopy that included extensive debridement of the patellar tendon, and a percutaneous repair of partial thickness tear of the patellar tendon, followed by an injection of platelet-rich plasma.

Outcomes: This patient had significant improvements of functional mobility and overall strength and range of motion. Improvements in qualitative improvements in self-efficacy and fear avoidance behaviors were also seen, although Lower extremity function scale did not show a significant improvement in the patient’s perception in his abilities.

Discussion: Patient functional improvements are thought to relate to his subsequent decrease in fear avoidance and increase in self-efficacy. As the patient progressed during therapy sessions, he would exhibit less apprehension during new tasks and have greater willingness to encounter new challenges. As such, progressive functional task training and exercises have been found to be an effective method to improve function and self-efficacy while decreasing fear avoidance.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Roberta OShea

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Apr 12th, 4:00 PM Apr 12th, 6:00 PM

The Relationship Between Fear Avoidance Behaviors, Self-Efficacy, And Functional Ability In Patients With A Patellar Tendon Rupture: A Retrospective Case Report

Background and Purpose: Patellar tendon injury is most commonly seen young to middle aged adults who participate in sports or lead an active life style. These patients many times are apprehension and are fearful of reinjury and may avoid return to sports and function. This fearful avoidance and subsequent decrease in self-efficacy are directly related to functional ability of a patient. The purpose of this case study is to investigate the relationship between fear avoidance behaviors, self-efficacy, and functional mobility in a patient who has undergone a patellar tendon repair.

Case description: The patient was a 24-year-old male who was a collegiate soccer athlete at the time of injury. This patient underwent a left knee arthroscopy that included extensive debridement of the patellar tendon, and a percutaneous repair of partial thickness tear of the patellar tendon, followed by an injection of platelet-rich plasma.

Outcomes: This patient had significant improvements of functional mobility and overall strength and range of motion. Improvements in qualitative improvements in self-efficacy and fear avoidance behaviors were also seen, although Lower extremity function scale did not show a significant improvement in the patient’s perception in his abilities.

Discussion: Patient functional improvements are thought to relate to his subsequent decrease in fear avoidance and increase in self-efficacy. As the patient progressed during therapy sessions, he would exhibit less apprehension during new tasks and have greater willingness to encounter new challenges. As such, progressive functional task training and exercises have been found to be an effective method to improve function and self-efficacy while decreasing fear avoidance.