Event Title

The addition of pelvic floor subjective screening to the initial systems review for female athletes presenting to physical therapy with chronic low back pain; A case report.

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Anne Best, Governors State UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-12-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 6:00 PM

Abstract

Background and Purpose : Chronic low back pain is a common musculoskeletal condition treated by physical therapists. An association between chronic low back pain and pelvic floor dysfunction in female ath letes was made in recent literature however the current clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of low back pain continue to exclude pelvic floor assessment and intervention. The purpose of this case report is to describe a need for the addition of pelvic floor subjective screening to augment the initial systems review for female athletes presenting to physical therapy with chronic low back pain in order to provide holistic and comprehensive care to optimize outcomes. Case Description : This case de scribes the physical therapy care delivered to a 20 year old Caucasian female with a medical diagnosis of chronic low back pain. During the course of treatment the patient noted pelvic floor dysfunction which was described as pain with vaginal penetration & changes in bowel and bladder. Outcomes : Both low back pain and pain with vaginal penetration was relieved, functional movement was restored, pelvic floor dysfunction resolved with normalcy in bowel/bladder and return to work/weight - lifting activities re sumed following 13 weeks of physical therapy. Discussion : A potential relationship between chronic low back pain and pelvic floor dysfunction in female athletes may be considered. The initial examinations for physical therapy should therefore be inclusive of subjective screening specific to pelvic floor function. The outcomes in this patient’s specific case began to improve remarkably after subjective screening and the addition of pelvic floor intervention. This retrospective case study demonstrates a need for pelvic floor subjective screening questions during an initial systems review in order to provide holistic and comprehensive care to optimize outcomes.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Dale Schuit

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Apr 12th, 4:00 PM Apr 12th, 6:00 PM

The addition of pelvic floor subjective screening to the initial systems review for female athletes presenting to physical therapy with chronic low back pain; A case report.

Background and Purpose : Chronic low back pain is a common musculoskeletal condition treated by physical therapists. An association between chronic low back pain and pelvic floor dysfunction in female ath letes was made in recent literature however the current clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of low back pain continue to exclude pelvic floor assessment and intervention. The purpose of this case report is to describe a need for the addition of pelvic floor subjective screening to augment the initial systems review for female athletes presenting to physical therapy with chronic low back pain in order to provide holistic and comprehensive care to optimize outcomes. Case Description : This case de scribes the physical therapy care delivered to a 20 year old Caucasian female with a medical diagnosis of chronic low back pain. During the course of treatment the patient noted pelvic floor dysfunction which was described as pain with vaginal penetration & changes in bowel and bladder. Outcomes : Both low back pain and pain with vaginal penetration was relieved, functional movement was restored, pelvic floor dysfunction resolved with normalcy in bowel/bladder and return to work/weight - lifting activities re sumed following 13 weeks of physical therapy. Discussion : A potential relationship between chronic low back pain and pelvic floor dysfunction in female athletes may be considered. The initial examinations for physical therapy should therefore be inclusive of subjective screening specific to pelvic floor function. The outcomes in this patient’s specific case began to improve remarkably after subjective screening and the addition of pelvic floor intervention. This retrospective case study demonstrates a need for pelvic floor subjective screening questions during an initial systems review in order to provide holistic and comprehensive care to optimize outcomes.