Event Title

Outcomes Following An Achilles Tendon Open Debridement and Decompression Surgery for Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Retrospective Case Report

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Jesse Larson, Governors State UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-12-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 6:00 PM

Abstract

Background/Purpose: Roughly 6% of the general population will experience some type of Achilles tendon pain. Of the 6% that will report Achilles tendon pain, approximately one-third will be diagnosed with insertional Achill es tendinopathy. Insertional Achilles tendinopathy can be difficult to manage conservatively. Typically, if conservative management fails, surgical interventions are used to promote tissue healing and return to prior level of function. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy outcomes for a patient who underwent a unique insertional Achilles tendinopathy surgical procedure. Case Description: The patient was a 58-year-old male that presented to an outpatient orthopedic clinic a year after a unique insertional Achilles tendinopathy surgery to address residual and functional impairments of his right ankle. During the initial examination, the patient demonstrated limited ankle range of motion, decreased plantarflexor strength, and poor ankle proprioception which impacted functional tasks. Outcomes: The patient demonstrated improvements with all tests and measures conducted during the initial examination.Common physical therapy interventions were utilized to address functional impairments. Despite improvements noted, this patient was unable to return to his active level of function prior to his initial ankle injury one year ago. Discussion: The patient demonstrated outcomes that are consistent with past literature findings for this patient population. Open debridement surgery has been shown optimal outcomes for this patient population, while an isolated gastrocnemius recession surgery has less favorable outcomes for patients who live an active lifestyle. The patient demonstrated improvements after physical therapy interventions but was unable to meet all his goals.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Dale Schuit

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Apr 12th, 4:00 PM Apr 12th, 6:00 PM

Outcomes Following An Achilles Tendon Open Debridement and Decompression Surgery for Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Retrospective Case Report

Background/Purpose: Roughly 6% of the general population will experience some type of Achilles tendon pain. Of the 6% that will report Achilles tendon pain, approximately one-third will be diagnosed with insertional Achill es tendinopathy. Insertional Achilles tendinopathy can be difficult to manage conservatively. Typically, if conservative management fails, surgical interventions are used to promote tissue healing and return to prior level of function. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy outcomes for a patient who underwent a unique insertional Achilles tendinopathy surgical procedure. Case Description: The patient was a 58-year-old male that presented to an outpatient orthopedic clinic a year after a unique insertional Achilles tendinopathy surgery to address residual and functional impairments of his right ankle. During the initial examination, the patient demonstrated limited ankle range of motion, decreased plantarflexor strength, and poor ankle proprioception which impacted functional tasks. Outcomes: The patient demonstrated improvements with all tests and measures conducted during the initial examination.Common physical therapy interventions were utilized to address functional impairments. Despite improvements noted, this patient was unable to return to his active level of function prior to his initial ankle injury one year ago. Discussion: The patient demonstrated outcomes that are consistent with past literature findings for this patient population. Open debridement surgery has been shown optimal outcomes for this patient population, while an isolated gastrocnemius recession surgery has less favorable outcomes for patients who live an active lifestyle. The patient demonstrated improvements after physical therapy interventions but was unable to meet all his goals.