Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Emily E. Metzger, Governors State UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-12-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

4-12-2019 12:15 PM

Abstract

Cryptosporidium is a microparasite that infects the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. This microparasite can cause waterborne disease and can be in any type of water source. In natural areas, animals, such as coyotes, drink from different water sources, such as streams, ponds, and stagnant pools. These water sources tend to have an abundance of fecal material run off from the surrounding areas. Because humans are slowly taking over natural land, they are having more frequent contact with wildlife. As coyotes are very pliable in using a diversity of habitats, they are slowing roaming into areas with a high human density. That being said, coyotes, and humans alike, may be more susceptible to ingesting Cryptosporidium and thus having cryptosporidiosis, which is a diarrheal disease. Although, because humans are not coming into contact with coyotes and their scat as often as other animals, suburban areas may have a smaller abundance whereas the prevalence of Cryptosporidium may be higher in rural areas because that is where coyotes still reside in their home ranges.

By taking samples of coyote scat and using a modified version of Kinyoun’s Acid-Fast Staining, I was able to find positive Cryptosporidium samples in both rural and suburban areas. Contrary to my hypothesis, the count of Cryptosporidium oocysts are more prevalent within suburban areas. Maybe humans do contribute to the movement of this microparasite more than previously recognized.

Identify Grant

Undergraduate Research

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

John Yunger, Snehal Chavda

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Apr 12th, 11:15 AM Apr 12th, 12:15 PM

Surveying Prevalence of Cryptosporidium in Fecal Material of Rural and Suburban Canis latrans of Illinois

Cryptosporidium is a microparasite that infects the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. This microparasite can cause waterborne disease and can be in any type of water source. In natural areas, animals, such as coyotes, drink from different water sources, such as streams, ponds, and stagnant pools. These water sources tend to have an abundance of fecal material run off from the surrounding areas. Because humans are slowly taking over natural land, they are having more frequent contact with wildlife. As coyotes are very pliable in using a diversity of habitats, they are slowing roaming into areas with a high human density. That being said, coyotes, and humans alike, may be more susceptible to ingesting Cryptosporidium and thus having cryptosporidiosis, which is a diarrheal disease. Although, because humans are not coming into contact with coyotes and their scat as often as other animals, suburban areas may have a smaller abundance whereas the prevalence of Cryptosporidium may be higher in rural areas because that is where coyotes still reside in their home ranges.

By taking samples of coyote scat and using a modified version of Kinyoun’s Acid-Fast Staining, I was able to find positive Cryptosporidium samples in both rural and suburban areas. Contrary to my hypothesis, the count of Cryptosporidium oocysts are more prevalent within suburban areas. Maybe humans do contribute to the movement of this microparasite more than previously recognized.