Event Title

Management of an Adult Patient Following Biceps Tenodesis and Subacromial Decompression Surgery: A Retrospective Case Report.

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Lauren Carniello, Governors State UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-12-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 6:00 PM

Abstract

Background/Purpose: There is a paucity of literature that describes the results of physical therapy interventions and evidence-based guidelines for after biceps tenodesis/subacromial decompression surgery. The purpose of this case report is to examine the outcomes of interventions used in physical therapy for a young adult patient who underwent biceps tenodesis and subacromial decompression surgery.

Case Description: The patient was a 25-year-old male who was referred to physical therapy 2 days post-surgery for a bicep tenodesis and subacromial decompression of the right shoulder. He originally injured his shoulder while performing a pectoral fly exercise on a cable machine at the gym and had received conservative physical therapy before seeking out surgery. The patient presented with decreased right shoulder strength, decreased right shoulder range of motion, increased pain with activity, and limited functional mobility. Interventions focused on strength, range of motion, functional activities, and pain relief. These interventions were guided by a rehabilitation protocol for biceps tenodesis provided by the surgeon.

Outcomes: The patient completed 35 physical therapy session in a 15-week period. Improvements were seen in right glenohumeral range of motion, right upper extremity strength, decreased pain with activity, and 81% change in functional ability of the right upper extremity using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (43% = clinically relevant).

Discussion: This case report demonstrated the positive physical therapy outcomes of specific exercises in combination with manual therapy and modalities on the patient’s functional abilities following biceps tenodesis/subacromial decompression on his right shoulder. The results of this case report may not be generalized to a larger population. Further research incorporating a greater sample size in a randomized control trial would be beneficial to examine the effects of specific therapies.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Dale Schuit

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Apr 12th, 4:00 PM Apr 12th, 6:00 PM

Management of an Adult Patient Following Biceps Tenodesis and Subacromial Decompression Surgery: A Retrospective Case Report.

Background/Purpose: There is a paucity of literature that describes the results of physical therapy interventions and evidence-based guidelines for after biceps tenodesis/subacromial decompression surgery. The purpose of this case report is to examine the outcomes of interventions used in physical therapy for a young adult patient who underwent biceps tenodesis and subacromial decompression surgery.

Case Description: The patient was a 25-year-old male who was referred to physical therapy 2 days post-surgery for a bicep tenodesis and subacromial decompression of the right shoulder. He originally injured his shoulder while performing a pectoral fly exercise on a cable machine at the gym and had received conservative physical therapy before seeking out surgery. The patient presented with decreased right shoulder strength, decreased right shoulder range of motion, increased pain with activity, and limited functional mobility. Interventions focused on strength, range of motion, functional activities, and pain relief. These interventions were guided by a rehabilitation protocol for biceps tenodesis provided by the surgeon.

Outcomes: The patient completed 35 physical therapy session in a 15-week period. Improvements were seen in right glenohumeral range of motion, right upper extremity strength, decreased pain with activity, and 81% change in functional ability of the right upper extremity using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (43% = clinically relevant).

Discussion: This case report demonstrated the positive physical therapy outcomes of specific exercises in combination with manual therapy and modalities on the patient’s functional abilities following biceps tenodesis/subacromial decompression on his right shoulder. The results of this case report may not be generalized to a larger population. Further research incorporating a greater sample size in a randomized control trial would be beneficial to examine the effects of specific therapies.