Event Title

Identification and Diversity of Phthalate Degrading Fungi in Riverine Sediments using Molecular Methods

Start Date

4-12-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 6:00 PM

Abstract

Phthalates are a common chemical compound used as plasticizers in various industries and exposure to these compounds has been linked to adverse effects on health. Due to their widespread use, they have become a common environmental pollutant of soil and water. The persistence and distribution of phthalate esters in the environment has given rise to many microorganisms that are able to incorporate phthalates into various metabolic pathways and degrade them into harmless substances. This study seeks to identify the genes that fungi carry that are responsible for phthalate degradation by using polymerase chain reaction. Diversity of fungal communities in response to presence of phthalates within soil will also be assessed and their capacity for phthalate degradation will be examined. Research has shown that the ability to degrade phthalate is widespread and nearly all fungal isolates were able to grow on media with phthalate as the sole carbon source. Fungi from samples derived from phthalate-contaminated sites had a higher diversity of and fungi than uncontaminated samples.

Identify Grant

Received 2017-2018 University Research Grant

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Timothy Gsell

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Apr 12th, 4:00 PM Apr 12th, 6:00 PM

Identification and Diversity of Phthalate Degrading Fungi in Riverine Sediments using Molecular Methods

Phthalates are a common chemical compound used as plasticizers in various industries and exposure to these compounds has been linked to adverse effects on health. Due to their widespread use, they have become a common environmental pollutant of soil and water. The persistence and distribution of phthalate esters in the environment has given rise to many microorganisms that are able to incorporate phthalates into various metabolic pathways and degrade them into harmless substances. This study seeks to identify the genes that fungi carry that are responsible for phthalate degradation by using polymerase chain reaction. Diversity of fungal communities in response to presence of phthalates within soil will also be assessed and their capacity for phthalate degradation will be examined. Research has shown that the ability to degrade phthalate is widespread and nearly all fungal isolates were able to grow on media with phthalate as the sole carbon source. Fungi from samples derived from phthalate-contaminated sites had a higher diversity of and fungi than uncontaminated samples.