Event Title

Political Difference and Marriage

Location

D34000

Start Date

4-12-2019 1:35 PM

End Date

4-12-2019 2:35 PM

Other Presentation Disciplines:

Political Science

Abstract

Using mixed-methods programmatic research, this presentation presents findings from a content analysis to develop a typology of political conflict based on participants’ descriptions of political disagreements with family members. Further, it presents results from two surveys and one qualitative study on political conflict in the home environment. Political disagreements concern partisanship, ideology, issues, and specific candidates and elections. Drawing on research on cross-cutting (Mutz, 2002) and dangerous discussions (Eveland & Hively 2009), this typology was then used to predict relational outcomes. Findings provide support for previous research that Republicans are more homogenous in close relationships (Mutz & Martin, 2001). Additionally, this program of research argues that individuals with less political information efficacy were more likely to report less communication satisfaction. Implications of the findings for family communication, network diversity, and asymmetric polarization are discussed.

Identify Grant

URG

Presentation File

wf_yes

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 1:35 PM Apr 12th, 2:35 PM

Political Difference and Marriage

D34000

Using mixed-methods programmatic research, this presentation presents findings from a content analysis to develop a typology of political conflict based on participants’ descriptions of political disagreements with family members. Further, it presents results from two surveys and one qualitative study on political conflict in the home environment. Political disagreements concern partisanship, ideology, issues, and specific candidates and elections. Drawing on research on cross-cutting (Mutz, 2002) and dangerous discussions (Eveland & Hively 2009), this typology was then used to predict relational outcomes. Findings provide support for previous research that Republicans are more homogenous in close relationships (Mutz & Martin, 2001). Additionally, this program of research argues that individuals with less political information efficacy were more likely to report less communication satisfaction. Implications of the findings for family communication, network diversity, and asymmetric polarization are discussed.