April 9 - Friday

Event Title

Cognitive Dissonance in Major Declaration

Start Date

4-9-2021 10:30 AM

End Date

4-9-2021 11:00 AM

Abstract

Cognitive Dissonance is defined as the mental discomfort an individual experiences when they hold two contradictory values or beliefs. While there is ample research on cognitive dissonance, very little focuses on how it impacts choice of major. This research aims to examine how familial relations, societal pressures, and socioeconomic status impacts major declaration at the collegiate level. The authors hypothesize that: 1. Those with lower SES are more likely to pursue practical degrees; 2. Familial relationships impact major declaration in both higher and lower SES.

Data collection began following IRB approval in December 2019. Data was collected via survey format. Data was collected at a 4-year university in the Midwest. Participants will be undergraduate students over the age of 18 at time of data collection. Undergraduates will complete a survey that was adapted from three previously established questionnaires.

Using basic correlations and multiple regression, we expect to find significance in levels of cognitive dissonance resulting from major declaration. Specifically, we expect to observe higher levels of dissonance in individuals identifying as low SES compared with those of high SES. Additionally, we expect to observe correlations of familial relationships and major declaration in both categories of SES. Because all students choose a major, identifying factors related to cognitive dissonance in major declaration is particularly useful for students. Previous research on the topic emphasizes the need for students to choose majors they find valuable and informative toward their future career choice (Chen & Zhou, 2018).

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Alli Cipra - Associate Professor

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Apr 9th, 10:30 AM Apr 9th, 11:00 AM

Cognitive Dissonance in Major Declaration

Cognitive Dissonance is defined as the mental discomfort an individual experiences when they hold two contradictory values or beliefs. While there is ample research on cognitive dissonance, very little focuses on how it impacts choice of major. This research aims to examine how familial relations, societal pressures, and socioeconomic status impacts major declaration at the collegiate level. The authors hypothesize that: 1. Those with lower SES are more likely to pursue practical degrees; 2. Familial relationships impact major declaration in both higher and lower SES.

Data collection began following IRB approval in December 2019. Data was collected via survey format. Data was collected at a 4-year university in the Midwest. Participants will be undergraduate students over the age of 18 at time of data collection. Undergraduates will complete a survey that was adapted from three previously established questionnaires.

Using basic correlations and multiple regression, we expect to find significance in levels of cognitive dissonance resulting from major declaration. Specifically, we expect to observe higher levels of dissonance in individuals identifying as low SES compared with those of high SES. Additionally, we expect to observe correlations of familial relationships and major declaration in both categories of SES. Because all students choose a major, identifying factors related to cognitive dissonance in major declaration is particularly useful for students. Previous research on the topic emphasizes the need for students to choose majors they find valuable and informative toward their future career choice (Chen & Zhou, 2018).