April 9 - Friday

Event Title

Ice Nucleation-Active Pseudomonads Prescence and Relative Abundance on Apple Phylloplanes in Five Different USDA Temperate Zones from Kentucky to the UP of Michigan

Start Date

4-9-2021 5:00 PM

End Date

4-9-2021 5:30 PM

Abstract

The process of frost formation requires the presence of an ice nucleus, and ice-nucleating active bacteria promotes the development of ice crystals on plants. This study focuses on apple trees of different varieties over several states and USDA Temperate Zones to isolate and determine the relative abundance of pseudomonad bacteria exhibiting ice nucleation activity (INA) on the phylloplane proportional to the total number of pseudomonads present. Isolates of Pseudomonads from the phylloplane were subjected to an Ice Nucleation Active Test (INA Test) where it was determined which of the bacterial colonies possessed INA. The data was processed in order to establish differences between Northern and Southern locations, and USDA temperate zone differences. Determining the relationship between these factors and the INA bacteria that live on apple leaves provides a better idea of how the apple trees are affected by environmental changes and the impact such bacteria may have. This study showed an overall Pseudomonas presence on the phylloplane of apple trees as being similar and different between North and South zones surveyed and USDA Temperate zones surveyed. The results showed that the greatest differences did not occur between the those hypothesized during the research, but were found between points in the southernmost area (Kentucky) and a northern point that was not the furthest point north. There was not a clear gradient or trend shown by the data to indicate a decrease in INA bacteria when following locations North to South.

Identify Grant

Undergraduate Research

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Timothy Gsell

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Apr 9th, 5:00 PM Apr 9th, 5:30 PM

Ice Nucleation-Active Pseudomonads Prescence and Relative Abundance on Apple Phylloplanes in Five Different USDA Temperate Zones from Kentucky to the UP of Michigan

The process of frost formation requires the presence of an ice nucleus, and ice-nucleating active bacteria promotes the development of ice crystals on plants. This study focuses on apple trees of different varieties over several states and USDA Temperate Zones to isolate and determine the relative abundance of pseudomonad bacteria exhibiting ice nucleation activity (INA) on the phylloplane proportional to the total number of pseudomonads present. Isolates of Pseudomonads from the phylloplane were subjected to an Ice Nucleation Active Test (INA Test) where it was determined which of the bacterial colonies possessed INA. The data was processed in order to establish differences between Northern and Southern locations, and USDA temperate zone differences. Determining the relationship between these factors and the INA bacteria that live on apple leaves provides a better idea of how the apple trees are affected by environmental changes and the impact such bacteria may have. This study showed an overall Pseudomonas presence on the phylloplane of apple trees as being similar and different between North and South zones surveyed and USDA Temperate zones surveyed. The results showed that the greatest differences did not occur between the those hypothesized during the research, but were found between points in the southernmost area (Kentucky) and a northern point that was not the furthest point north. There was not a clear gradient or trend shown by the data to indicate a decrease in INA bacteria when following locations North to South.