On Demand

Event Title

Reliability of responsibility: A predictor for romantic relationship satisfaction and cohesion in incarcerated coparents

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Abstract

Families are forced to restructure and renegotiate roles of members when a father becomes incarcerated. The nonincarcerated adult partner may have to act as the primary caretaker as well as act as gatekeeper regarding father- child interaction. A strong coparenting alliance between the incarcerated father and his nonincarcerated partner can help facilitate healthy family outcomes, including relationship satisfaction and cohesion across the parenting dyad. Conceptualizing through a Structural Family Therapy lens was helpful to understand healthy family structure, rules, roles, and boundaries for families experiencing the impacts of incarceration. Actor-Partner Interdependence Modeling is employed in this study using data from the Multi-site Family Study on Incarceration, Parenting and Partnering to examine the relationship between perceived reliability of parenting responsibilities, relationship satisfaction, and cohesion. Findings suggest that being able to rely on one’s partner to follow through with their parenting responsibilities, as well as having a partner who can rely on them, is an important predictor for intimate-partner relationship satisfaction and cohesion. This study emphasizes the need for therapeutic services in incarcerated settings to strengthen incarcerated romantic and coparenting relationships. Policy and clinical implications as well as future research directions are discussed.

Description of Program

This is a play-on demand program.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Eman Tadros

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Reliability of responsibility: A predictor for romantic relationship satisfaction and cohesion in incarcerated coparents

Families are forced to restructure and renegotiate roles of members when a father becomes incarcerated. The nonincarcerated adult partner may have to act as the primary caretaker as well as act as gatekeeper regarding father- child interaction. A strong coparenting alliance between the incarcerated father and his nonincarcerated partner can help facilitate healthy family outcomes, including relationship satisfaction and cohesion across the parenting dyad. Conceptualizing through a Structural Family Therapy lens was helpful to understand healthy family structure, rules, roles, and boundaries for families experiencing the impacts of incarceration. Actor-Partner Interdependence Modeling is employed in this study using data from the Multi-site Family Study on Incarceration, Parenting and Partnering to examine the relationship between perceived reliability of parenting responsibilities, relationship satisfaction, and cohesion. Findings suggest that being able to rely on one’s partner to follow through with their parenting responsibilities, as well as having a partner who can rely on them, is an important predictor for intimate-partner relationship satisfaction and cohesion. This study emphasizes the need for therapeutic services in incarcerated settings to strengthen incarcerated romantic and coparenting relationships. Policy and clinical implications as well as future research directions are discussed.