April 8 - Thursday

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Deborah J. Clair, Governors State UniversityFollow

Start Date

4-8-2021 5:30 PM

End Date

4-8-2021 6:00 PM

Abstract

At successful high schools, professional educators hold high expectations for all students to become leaders regardless of the grades students may receive in high school, including grades of “C” or “D.” When all students are supported and held accountable, and the college buzz is in the air, students remain engaged and committed to attending post-secondary education- a key factor in student leadership development (Fazekas & Warren, n.d.). Educators need to use an anti-deficit framework approach in leadership education for students who perform below average and highlight how students out of classroom experiences (for example, students who may be musically inclined but not academically astute, students who are incredible artists that may not be high-scoring scholars, and some students work in their communities as leaders in a variety of capacities which may not be academically inclined to achieve in school) also contribute to students’ leadership development.

The purpose of this poster is to detail current research on post-secondary leadership and success. Emerging as a leader often is an arduous task, especially as a high schooler. The person needs to develop enough self-awareness or emotional intelligence to make them aware of their leadership capacity. Reitan contends that leadership development begins in early grades. This poster will advance the findings of Reitan and demonstrate how secondary educators can further develop all students' leadership skills, including those receiving Cs or Ds.

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Apr 8th, 5:30 PM Apr 8th, 6:00 PM

Post-secondary Leadership and Success: Promoting Leadership Development in Academically Low-Achieving Students

At successful high schools, professional educators hold high expectations for all students to become leaders regardless of the grades students may receive in high school, including grades of “C” or “D.” When all students are supported and held accountable, and the college buzz is in the air, students remain engaged and committed to attending post-secondary education- a key factor in student leadership development (Fazekas & Warren, n.d.). Educators need to use an anti-deficit framework approach in leadership education for students who perform below average and highlight how students out of classroom experiences (for example, students who may be musically inclined but not academically astute, students who are incredible artists that may not be high-scoring scholars, and some students work in their communities as leaders in a variety of capacities which may not be academically inclined to achieve in school) also contribute to students’ leadership development.

The purpose of this poster is to detail current research on post-secondary leadership and success. Emerging as a leader often is an arduous task, especially as a high schooler. The person needs to develop enough self-awareness or emotional intelligence to make them aware of their leadership capacity. Reitan contends that leadership development begins in early grades. This poster will advance the findings of Reitan and demonstrate how secondary educators can further develop all students' leadership skills, including those receiving Cs or Ds.