Event Title

Soil Aggregation and Associated Soil Organic Carbon in Two Forest Types in the Huron Mountains, Michigan

Start Date

4-8-2022 10:30 AM

End Date

4-8-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important indicator of soil quality and health. Soil aggregates provide physical protection for SOC and serves as an important mechanism for carbon Sequestration. In this study, the amount and distribution of SOC pool with soil aggregate-size fractions were investigated in two forest types, Hemlock-Red Pine forests and Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests, in Huron Mountain of Michigan. Results showed the proportions of macro-aggregates (>1 mm, 0.25-1 mm) was higher in Hemlock-Red Pine forests (87.3%) than in Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests (73.7%), suggesting that habitats in Hemlock-Red Pine forests benefited the formation and stability of macro-aggregates and the conditions in Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests facilitated to assemble micro-aggregates. SOC concentration obviously decreased with soil depths in micro-aggregates (0.053-0.25 mm, < 0.053 mm) in both examined forests. In Hemlock-Red Pine forests, macro-aggregates had a higher SOC concentration than micro-aggregates. SOC stocks was higher in Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests (89.79 t/ha) than in Hemlock-Red Pine forests (52.25 t/ha). The proportions of aggregate sizes - associated SOC content were similar in the two forest types.

Identify Grant

The research was financially supported by Huron Mountain Wildlife Foundation grant and GSU Center for the Junior Year Grant.

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Apr 8th, 10:30 AM Apr 8th, 12:00 PM

Soil Aggregation and Associated Soil Organic Carbon in Two Forest Types in the Huron Mountains, Michigan

Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important indicator of soil quality and health. Soil aggregates provide physical protection for SOC and serves as an important mechanism for carbon Sequestration. In this study, the amount and distribution of SOC pool with soil aggregate-size fractions were investigated in two forest types, Hemlock-Red Pine forests and Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests, in Huron Mountain of Michigan. Results showed the proportions of macro-aggregates (>1 mm, 0.25-1 mm) was higher in Hemlock-Red Pine forests (87.3%) than in Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests (73.7%), suggesting that habitats in Hemlock-Red Pine forests benefited the formation and stability of macro-aggregates and the conditions in Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests facilitated to assemble micro-aggregates. SOC concentration obviously decreased with soil depths in micro-aggregates (0.053-0.25 mm, < 0.053 mm) in both examined forests. In Hemlock-Red Pine forests, macro-aggregates had a higher SOC concentration than micro-aggregates. SOC stocks was higher in Maple-Aspen-Poplar forests (89.79 t/ha) than in Hemlock-Red Pine forests (52.25 t/ha). The proportions of aggregate sizes - associated SOC content were similar in the two forest types.