Event Title

Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Mindfulness to Prevent Incarcerated Suicide: A Case Study

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Abstract

From 2011 to 2012, incarcerated individuals in both prisons and jails were three to five times more likely to have serious psychological distress than the general population. Many incarcerated individuals do not have access to adequate mental health treatment, though. Rather than rehabilitation, correctional facilities focus on separating individuals deemed dangerous or deviant from the general population. With the rise of mentally ill individuals becoming incarcerated, suicide is a problem in facilities across the nation. While literature continues to document use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and mindfulness separately, its documentation of both as a successful suicide prevention technique for this population is limited. The purpose of this case study is to explore how the use of CBT and mindfulness can prevent suicide for at-risk detainees. CBT and mindfulness interventions used in this study showed potential efficacy with an incarcerated man at-risk for suicide.

Presenters:
Marykate Godinez
Graduate Student
Dr. Eman Tadros
Assistant Professor College of Education

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Eman Tadros

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Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Mindfulness to Prevent Incarcerated Suicide: A Case Study

From 2011 to 2012, incarcerated individuals in both prisons and jails were three to five times more likely to have serious psychological distress than the general population. Many incarcerated individuals do not have access to adequate mental health treatment, though. Rather than rehabilitation, correctional facilities focus on separating individuals deemed dangerous or deviant from the general population. With the rise of mentally ill individuals becoming incarcerated, suicide is a problem in facilities across the nation. While literature continues to document use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and mindfulness separately, its documentation of both as a successful suicide prevention technique for this population is limited. The purpose of this case study is to explore how the use of CBT and mindfulness can prevent suicide for at-risk detainees. CBT and mindfulness interventions used in this study showed potential efficacy with an incarcerated man at-risk for suicide.

Presenters:
Marykate Godinez
Graduate Student
Dr. Eman Tadros
Assistant Professor College of Education