Event Title

Use of Auditory Cues and its Impact on Upper Extremity Function Post Stroke: A Scoping Review

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Richard Mohar, Governors State UniversityFollow

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-8-2022 4:00 PM

End Date

4-8-2022 6:00 PM

Abstract

Stroke is one of the most common causes of acquired disability, with limited positive outcomes for those affected in the upper extremity. The purpose of this review is to showcase the results and implications of using auditory cues as an adjunct to physical therapy when focusing on rehabilitation of the upper extremities. Google scholar was searched and a total of 12 papers were reviewed, only including those that compared melodic, rhythmic, or other auditory cues as intervention in the context of the upper extremity. The current literature discussed did not find statistically significant differences between conventional therapy and therapy using auditory stimulation as an adjunct. Future studies should try to narrow the parameters of using auditory cues to find out what aspects of it are capable of enhancing outcomes, if at all.

Presenter:
Richard Mohar
Physical Therapy Doctoral Student

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Mary Jones
Assistant Professor, College of Health and Human Services

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Apr 8th, 4:00 PM Apr 8th, 6:00 PM

Use of Auditory Cues and its Impact on Upper Extremity Function Post Stroke: A Scoping Review

Hall of Governors

Stroke is one of the most common causes of acquired disability, with limited positive outcomes for those affected in the upper extremity. The purpose of this review is to showcase the results and implications of using auditory cues as an adjunct to physical therapy when focusing on rehabilitation of the upper extremities. Google scholar was searched and a total of 12 papers were reviewed, only including those that compared melodic, rhythmic, or other auditory cues as intervention in the context of the upper extremity. The current literature discussed did not find statistically significant differences between conventional therapy and therapy using auditory stimulation as an adjunct. Future studies should try to narrow the parameters of using auditory cues to find out what aspects of it are capable of enhancing outcomes, if at all.

Presenter:
Richard Mohar
Physical Therapy Doctoral Student