Event Title

Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Interventions for a Patient 4 Weeks Post Partial Meniscectomy: A Retrospective Case Report

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Jonathan Sydlowski, Governors State UniversityFollow

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-8-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

4-8-2022 3:00 PM

Abstract

Meniscal tears are one of the most common knee injuries, with about 500,000 cases per year in the United States alone. When a tear is limiting a patient’s functional mobility, the meniscal tissue can be removed. There are two procedures to remove the meniscal tissue following a tear, a total or partial meniscectomy. For a total meniscectomy, the entire meniscus is removed, and for an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM), the surgeon removes as little meniscal tissue as possible, such as unstable meniscal fragments, while the remaining edges are smoothed over. According to research by Peterson and colleagues the removal of the meniscal tissue after an injury may lead to osteoarthritis within 10 to 20 years after the procedure. In addition, Starke and colleagues reported that meniscal tissue from patients 40 years of age or older have less cellularity and a decreased healing response in their meniscal tissue than tissue from younger patients. A randomized control trail by Gauffin et al, demonstrated that arthroscopic surgery provided better pain relief compared with nonoperative treatment at a 1-year follow-up in patients with meniscal pathology. Following meniscal surgery, ROM and strength are important in return to a patient’s prior level of function.

Presenter:
Jonathan Sydlowski
Physical Therapy Doctoral Student

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Scott Getsoian
Assistant Professor, College of Health and Human Services

Dr. Renee Theiss
Associate Professor, College of Health and Human Services

Julie Tuweig
Adjunct Faculty, College of Health and Human Services

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Apr 8th, 1:00 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Interventions for a Patient 4 Weeks Post Partial Meniscectomy: A Retrospective Case Report

Hall of Governors

Meniscal tears are one of the most common knee injuries, with about 500,000 cases per year in the United States alone. When a tear is limiting a patient’s functional mobility, the meniscal tissue can be removed. There are two procedures to remove the meniscal tissue following a tear, a total or partial meniscectomy. For a total meniscectomy, the entire meniscus is removed, and for an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM), the surgeon removes as little meniscal tissue as possible, such as unstable meniscal fragments, while the remaining edges are smoothed over. According to research by Peterson and colleagues the removal of the meniscal tissue after an injury may lead to osteoarthritis within 10 to 20 years after the procedure. In addition, Starke and colleagues reported that meniscal tissue from patients 40 years of age or older have less cellularity and a decreased healing response in their meniscal tissue than tissue from younger patients. A randomized control trail by Gauffin et al, demonstrated that arthroscopic surgery provided better pain relief compared with nonoperative treatment at a 1-year follow-up in patients with meniscal pathology. Following meniscal surgery, ROM and strength are important in return to a patient’s prior level of function.

Presenter:
Jonathan Sydlowski
Physical Therapy Doctoral Student