Event Title

Acute Inpatient Physical Therapy Rehabilitation for a Patient with Orthopedic Injury Post Alcohol Withdrawal Seizure: A Retrospective Case Report

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Brittany Hancock-Brown, Governors State UniversityFollow

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Location

Virtual Poster Session

Abstract

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a commonly experienced condition in the acute care setting and has physical impacts on patient’s functional mobility and physical status. The purpose of this case report is to explore how physical therapy can best address AWS-associated impairments.
Case Description: The patient, KH, was a 63-year-old male who was admitted to the hospital following seizures caused by AWS. Following a five day stay in the critical care unit (CCU), KH received imaging which revealed he had a total rotator cuff tear. KH then presented to physical therapy in the acute inpatient setting where he was evaluated and received five sessions of physical therapy during his inpatient stay. The physical therapy plan of care consisted of strengthening, balance interventions, gait training interventions, and functional mobility training.
Outcomes: As determined by the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), KH demonstrated no significant decrease in pain over the course of his stay. KH initially required minimal assistance with sit-stand transfers and moderate assistance with supine-sit bed mobility. By the end of his stay, KH only required supervision for both sit-stand transfers and for supine-sit bed mobility. KH’s initial activity measure for post-acute care (AM-PAC) mobility score was 17 and it increased to 21 by discharge, indicating significant improvement.
Conclusion: Transfer training, gait training interventions, and functional mobility training contributed to improved outcomes in the present case study of a patient with AWS and a total rotator cuff tear.

Presenter:
Brittany Hancock-Brown
Physical Therapy Doctoral Student

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Roberta K. O'Shea
Professor, College of Health and Human Services

Presentation File

wf_yes

Poster Presentation Brittany Hancock Brown.pdf (299 kB)
PT Poster Brittany Hancock-Brown

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Acute Inpatient Physical Therapy Rehabilitation for a Patient with Orthopedic Injury Post Alcohol Withdrawal Seizure: A Retrospective Case Report

Virtual Poster Session

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a commonly experienced condition in the acute care setting and has physical impacts on patient’s functional mobility and physical status. The purpose of this case report is to explore how physical therapy can best address AWS-associated impairments.
Case Description: The patient, KH, was a 63-year-old male who was admitted to the hospital following seizures caused by AWS. Following a five day stay in the critical care unit (CCU), KH received imaging which revealed he had a total rotator cuff tear. KH then presented to physical therapy in the acute inpatient setting where he was evaluated and received five sessions of physical therapy during his inpatient stay. The physical therapy plan of care consisted of strengthening, balance interventions, gait training interventions, and functional mobility training.
Outcomes: As determined by the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), KH demonstrated no significant decrease in pain over the course of his stay. KH initially required minimal assistance with sit-stand transfers and moderate assistance with supine-sit bed mobility. By the end of his stay, KH only required supervision for both sit-stand transfers and for supine-sit bed mobility. KH’s initial activity measure for post-acute care (AM-PAC) mobility score was 17 and it increased to 21 by discharge, indicating significant improvement.
Conclusion: Transfer training, gait training interventions, and functional mobility training contributed to improved outcomes in the present case study of a patient with AWS and a total rotator cuff tear.

Presenter:
Brittany Hancock-Brown
Physical Therapy Doctoral Student