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Start Date

4-6-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

4-6-2022 2:00 PM

Abstract

Life is full of choices—what to eat for breakfast, whom to marry or whether one should enlist in the army. Every decision, no matter how significant or important it is, may lead to an experience of regret (Kahneman & Tversky, 1982). Regret is a common emotion that people experience when they reflect on their past decisions and realize that the outcomes could have been different had they made a different choice (Beike, Markman & Karadogan, 2009). There are many factors that intensify the amount of regret experiences. Prior research suggests failed actions (e.g., changing an initially correct answer on a multiple choice exam to a wrong answer) results in more regret than failed inactions (e.g., sticking to the wrong answer and missing the question). Although this action effect is a robust finding in regret literature, a group of researchers reported that it is the in-actions that hurt people the most (Gilovich & Medvec, 1995). When people are asked to reflect on their past experiences, it is the inactions they report regretting more (e.g., I wish I spent more time with my dad before he passed away). Furthermore, the amount of regret experienced at one point can change over time. That is, people may adopt certain coping strategies to mitigate its effects (Gilovich and Medvec, 1995; Bauer, Wrosch, Jobin, 2008). Research suggests that spirituality has a positive effect on emotional wellbeing (Brown, Carney, Parrish & Klem, 2013; Yamada, Lukoff, Lim, & Mancuso; 2020) especially with regards to managing depression and anxiety. This study will explore whether spirituality can regulate the amount of regret one might experience stemming from actions and inactions. Specifically, we hypothesize that higher levels of spirituality will reduce the amount of regret experienced.

To explore this hypothesis, a 2 (Decision Type: Actions vs Inaction) x 2 (Spirituality: Low vs High) between subjects design will be used. By adopting a vignette paradigm, the decision type (actions vs inactions) will be manipulated. Additionally, participants will be asked to complete the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale (ISS) (Allport & Ross, 1967).

Presenters:
Justine Asas
Undergraduate Student, College of Health and Human Services
Marley Hawkins
Undergraduate Student, College of Education

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Figen Karadogan, Ph.D.

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Does Spirituality Affect Your Amount of Regret Poster

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Apr 6th, 1:00 PM Apr 6th, 2:00 PM

Does Spirituality Affect Your Amount of Regret?

Life is full of choices—what to eat for breakfast, whom to marry or whether one should enlist in the army. Every decision, no matter how significant or important it is, may lead to an experience of regret (Kahneman & Tversky, 1982). Regret is a common emotion that people experience when they reflect on their past decisions and realize that the outcomes could have been different had they made a different choice (Beike, Markman & Karadogan, 2009). There are many factors that intensify the amount of regret experiences. Prior research suggests failed actions (e.g., changing an initially correct answer on a multiple choice exam to a wrong answer) results in more regret than failed inactions (e.g., sticking to the wrong answer and missing the question). Although this action effect is a robust finding in regret literature, a group of researchers reported that it is the in-actions that hurt people the most (Gilovich & Medvec, 1995). When people are asked to reflect on their past experiences, it is the inactions they report regretting more (e.g., I wish I spent more time with my dad before he passed away). Furthermore, the amount of regret experienced at one point can change over time. That is, people may adopt certain coping strategies to mitigate its effects (Gilovich and Medvec, 1995; Bauer, Wrosch, Jobin, 2008). Research suggests that spirituality has a positive effect on emotional wellbeing (Brown, Carney, Parrish & Klem, 2013; Yamada, Lukoff, Lim, & Mancuso; 2020) especially with regards to managing depression and anxiety. This study will explore whether spirituality can regulate the amount of regret one might experience stemming from actions and inactions. Specifically, we hypothesize that higher levels of spirituality will reduce the amount of regret experienced.

To explore this hypothesis, a 2 (Decision Type: Actions vs Inaction) x 2 (Spirituality: Low vs High) between subjects design will be used. By adopting a vignette paradigm, the decision type (actions vs inactions) will be manipulated. Additionally, participants will be asked to complete the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale (ISS) (Allport & Ross, 1967).

Presenters:
Justine Asas
Undergraduate Student, College of Health and Human Services
Marley Hawkins
Undergraduate Student, College of Education