Oral Storying: A Light for The Future of Writing

Author/ Authors/ Presenter/ Presenters/ Panelists:

Yahkob Fayyumi, Governors State UniversityFollow

Location

D34160

Start Date

3-31-2023 10:30 AM

End Date

3-31-2023 11:30 AM

Abstract

What are the types of communication? Communication is made up of 2 branches: verbal and non-verbal. Verbal consists of oral and written words. Non-verbal is any communication without spoken words and written language: signs, codes, body language, etc. (Communication Theory, 2014). Writing is an essential skill that we use throughout our daily lives: signing our name, filling out paperwork, taking notes, and in our careers. Without writing a person’s quality of life could be hindered dramatically. A statistic that illustrates this point is that “80% of employers state writing as an essential skill that is required in the field” (National Association of Colleges & Employers, 2019). Unfortunately, the National Association of Colleges & Employers (NAEP) shows that when it comes to writing skills, only about 27% of students’ grades four through twelve measures at the proficiency level (NCES, 2007). Experts refer to the early childhood stage as the sensitive phase; this is where the brain’s plasticity is at its pinnacle. As educators, it is crucial that we capitalize on this sensitive phase by ensuring children are developing properly. One way we could do this is teaching kindergartners communication, specifically in writing. An effective technique is using oral narrative instruction to improve kindergarten writing. First, it develops text generation. Second, it enhances writing abilities. Third, it improves the teacher’s writing instruction. After these three points are examined the practicality of this strategy will be revealed. Technique one: teach using retelling, then generalize to personal and fictional generations. Technique two: model simple stories and increase their complexity over time Technique three: employ visuals, then fade them...

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Dr. Candace Smith

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Mar 31st, 10:30 AM Mar 31st, 11:30 AM

Oral Storying: A Light for The Future of Writing

D34160

What are the types of communication? Communication is made up of 2 branches: verbal and non-verbal. Verbal consists of oral and written words. Non-verbal is any communication without spoken words and written language: signs, codes, body language, etc. (Communication Theory, 2014). Writing is an essential skill that we use throughout our daily lives: signing our name, filling out paperwork, taking notes, and in our careers. Without writing a person’s quality of life could be hindered dramatically. A statistic that illustrates this point is that “80% of employers state writing as an essential skill that is required in the field” (National Association of Colleges & Employers, 2019). Unfortunately, the National Association of Colleges & Employers (NAEP) shows that when it comes to writing skills, only about 27% of students’ grades four through twelve measures at the proficiency level (NCES, 2007). Experts refer to the early childhood stage as the sensitive phase; this is where the brain’s plasticity is at its pinnacle. As educators, it is crucial that we capitalize on this sensitive phase by ensuring children are developing properly. One way we could do this is teaching kindergartners communication, specifically in writing. An effective technique is using oral narrative instruction to improve kindergarten writing. First, it develops text generation. Second, it enhances writing abilities. Third, it improves the teacher’s writing instruction. After these three points are examined the practicality of this strategy will be revealed. Technique one: teach using retelling, then generalize to personal and fictional generations. Technique two: model simple stories and increase their complexity over time Technique three: employ visuals, then fade them...