Research Day 2018 Schedule

Schedule

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2018
Friday, April 6th
9:00 AM

Opening Session

Elizabeth Cada, Governors State University

Engbretson Hall

9:00 AM - 9:20 AM

Welcome and remarks by Dr. Beth Cada, Interim Provost, Governors State University

9:30 AM

First Ever First-Year Student Adjustment to College: Cultivating Community, Voice, and Place for First-Year Students at GSU

Jayne Goode, Governors State University
Jelena Radovic-Fanta, Governors State University
Amy Vujaklija, Governors State University

D34115

9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Program description as provided by the author:

In Fall 2014 Governors State University (GSU) welcomed its first ever cohort of 242 first-year students. Following the guidelines established by the Leadership Education & America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative, GSU incorporated four high impact practices—learning communities, first year seminars, common intellectual experiences, and writing intensive courses—aimed at improving student learning and achieving higher levels of student persistence. These practices have demonstrated a particular benefit for first generation students who come from economically challenged communities and/or identify as students of color. While many students navigate a divide between their home and academic worlds, research reveals that students “learn best by interacting with others and sharing experiences” (Lei 2011 et al.).

The proposed panel is formed by researchers of GSU’s First Year Experience Study (FYES), an ongoing investigation examining the factors that have positively or negatively impacted students’ college experiences at GSU. This longitudinal project examines the perspectives of three years of first year classes on high impact educational practices, as well as the impact that their high school preparation, cultural backgrounds, families, friends, and communities have had on their college experience. The objectives are to: 1) examine the obstacles first generation students face in the cohort model at GSU; 2) understand what experiences and relationships have enhanced student’s college experience at GSU; and 3) analyze how the cohort model can better facilitate learning and socialization at GSU. During the presentation, three presenters will address the research methods used, key preliminary findings, and the significance of the research.

Modeling and Simulation of a Bicycle Race

J. Christopher Tweddle, Governors State University

D1496

9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

The sport of cycling includes a wide variety of racing situations and disciplines. Track races are held both indoors and out in velodromes on an oval track with banked corners; road races are held on flat, hilly, and mountainous courses on urban and rural paved streets; mountain bike and cyclocross races are held on dirt tracks that may include obstacles and hills. Disciplines include individual and team races, sprint and endurance distances, as well as single-day and multi-stage events. In this presentation, we will discuss the assumptions and features of the proposed model and present preliminary simulation attempts to model the individual time trial. A revised model will be presented and the simulation results compared to the outcomes of the individual time trial at the 2017 Tour de France.

Privilege and Prejudice

Elizabeth A. Cottrell, Governors State University
James Werner, Governors State University
Michelle Westergaard, Governors State University
Alli Cipra, Governors State University
Grier Casagrande, Governors State University

D34005

9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Program description as provided by author:

5 mins : Introduction Power point presentation: Definition of: Privilege with examples, Prejudice with examples.Microaggression with example.

10 mins : Privilege Walk Activity – Participants stand in a single line. Approximately 20 statements are read aloud with the directions of take one step forward for statements of privilege or backward for statements of minority membership that apply to you.

10 mins : Identification of Microaggression in Statements and their Interpretations Activity- Participants are given a paper with Column A having commonly stated Microaggressions, and Column B having possible interpretations. Participants would then be asked to match Column A with possible interpretations in Column B.

5 mins: Debriefing. Review of what was shared and experienced by all participants. Along with tips on how to become more conscience of everyday microaggressions.

Undergraduate Research: Experiences of Successful African-American Women at GSU #BLACKGIRLMAGIC

Alexis Smith, Governors State University
Autumn Price, Governors State University
Akya Gossit, Governors State University
Trauvell Crawford, Governors State University

D1497

9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

The success of African-American women is oftentimes unacknowledged in higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study is to illuminate how African-American women successfully navigate their junior-year of college. This research is important because African-American women are oppressed time and again based upon their race and gender, so these focus groups provided a forum to discuss their goals and success. Data collection, led by four undergraduate students, involved four focus groups that allowed African-American women with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and higher to discuss how they succeeded in their junior-year at a mid-sized, public institution. The researchers will discuss how higher education administrators can support African-American women, and in turn, stimulate conditions within the collegiate environments that foster student success.

10:10 AM

Disciplining English

Haley Walsh, Governors State University
Sarah Wiora, Governors State University
Rene Parks, Governors State University
Elizabeth Neris, Governors State University

D1497

10:10 AM - 11:10 AM

Research and writing in the English discipline expands the meaning of any particular text by engaging in academic discourse. Promoting scholarship through research and analysis fosters the English discipline. Our panel will explore several areas of study in the English discipline, as well as various approaches to both research and presentation.

Haley Walsh abstract: “All Silent On Every Front” analyzes the common thread of silence that ties WWI poetry, from the trenches to the Homefront, to the events of the war. The silence inflicted by language barriers and the government is represented by the poets that grapple to handle the devastation of the Great War.

Sarah Wiora abstract: Examined through the lens of rhetorical analysis and publics theory, "The Public Performance of the Women's March" examines ways in which the Women's March created a public sphere, as well as focusing specifically on the public performance and rhetorical aspects of signs present at the Women's March.

Rene Parks abstract: Guided by leading theories in eco-critical scholarship, ‘Reimagining Oceanic Interdependency’ examines the relevance of Moby Dick and A Tale for the Time Being, in light of each other. Eco-critical examination of these novels reinforces the significance of the power of narrative writing and humanity’s innate bond to the natural world.

Elizabeth Neris abstract: Utilizing scholarship on Nathanial Hawthorne, ‘The Light and Dark of The Scarlet Letter’examines how Hawthorne’s use of ‘light’ and ‘shadow/s’ in The Scarlet Letter symbolize ideals of American Romanticism.

Quantitative Analysis of Anti-histamine, Anti-diabetic, and Analgesic Pharmaceutical Drugs by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

Shailendra Kumar, Governors State University
Michael Villanueva, Governors State University
Aditya Rayarao, Governors State University
Kristen Chismudy, Governors State University

D1496

10:10 AM - 11:10 AM

Three representative drugs, one each from anti-histamine, anti-diabetic, and analgesic categories were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Cetirizine dihydrochloride, the active ingredient of anti-histamine drug, Zyrtec, was analyzed by HPLC using Grace C-18 column with 1 mL/minute flow of a mobile phase comprising a 30:70 mixture of 2.25 pH phosphate buffer solution and acetonitrile with a UV detector at 230 nm wavelength. A set of ten standard solutions, ran in triplicate, in the concentration range of 11 – 110 mg/mL yielded a linear curve with R2 value of 0.9994, thus establishing a working calibration curve in this range. Analysis of tablets from a commercial sample showed to contain 8.2 mg in each tablet, which is 18 % lower than the amount of 10 mg stated in the label of the product. In the category of anti-diabetic drugs, linagliptin, the active ingredient of Tradjenta, was analyzed by a similar method with a slight variation in the mobile phase and UV detector wavelength. A linear calibration curve with R2 value of 0.9997 was established for a concentration range of 5 – 50 mg/mL. In the category of analgesic drugs, ibuprofen, the active ingredient of Motrin, was analyzed by a similar method with a slight variation in the mobile phase and UV detector wavelength. A linear calibration curve with R2 value of 0.9994 was established for a concentration range of 0.21 – 1.9 mg/mL. The future studies include comparison of these results with analysis of these drugs by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (q-NMR) technique.

Student-veteran Discussion Facilitators in the GSU Classroom: "War, Trauma, and the Humanities"

Rosemary Johnsen, Governors State University
Akya Gossitt, Governors State University
Robert Mason, Governors State University
Victor Garcia, Governors State University
Muriel Williams, Governors State University
Jermaine Drayton, Governors State University

D34005

10:10 AM - 11:10 AM

Description of program as provided by the author:

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant program Dialogues on the Experience of War was launched in 2015 in order to support the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. GSU professors Dr. Rosemary Johnsen and Dr. Andrae Marak saw in the program an opportunity to serve the university's students and the wider community. 5 GSU student-veterans were selected in a competitive process: Jermaine Drayton, Victor Jesus Garcia, Akya Gossitt, Robert Mason, and Muriel Williams. The student-veterans trained for 6 weeks with class materials, and were embedded as discussion facilitators in an English special-topics course offered Fall Semester 2017. The class explored war-related literature, film, and non-fiction, learning from each other and from guest speakers. The course ended on December 4, 2017, with a televised town hall event filmed in the GSU studios featuring the 5 student-veterans. During this research day session, the student-veterans will share reflections on their work with GSU students in the grant-supported class, "War, Trauma, and the Humanities."

Transformational Leadership and Quality in Head Start Programs

Carol Morrison, Governors State University

D34115

10:10 AM - 11:10 AM

This study examined the leadership style of Head Start and Early Head Start leaders in the context of program quality. The study was designed to answer the question: Does transformational leadership contribute to quality in Head Start/Early Head Start programs?

Using a quantitative design within a transformational leadership theory framework, Head Start/Early Head Start Directors, Education Coordinators, Site/Center Directors and Chief Executive Officers will be asked to answer a brief (10- 15 minute) survey. Information on the education level of the leader, years of experience of the leader, program site accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, grantee monitoring status, and designation renewal status for all programs was requested. In addition, information from the most recent Program Information Report (PIR) was requested on the survey. CLASS Instructional Learning Format Scores for Head Start programs were also examined. Leadership style was measured by the Global Transformational Leadership Scale (GTL), (Carless, Wearing & Mann, 2000) a valid and reliable scale of transformational leadership that is seven questions in length.

Data was gathered using a link embedded in email leading to a Survey Monkey © hosted survey. Recipients were asked to forward to other leaders within their program. Data was analyzed using Bivariate Correlation analysis and yielded moderate correlations to several of the quality indicators. Leadership is important in Head Start programs and has a moderate but significant effect on quality in programs.

10:30 AM

Poster Session 1

GSU Office of the Provost, Governors State University

Hall of Governors - Governors State University

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Please see Poster Session track for titles and abstracts of scheduled posters during this session. https://opus.govst.edu/research_day/2018/poster_sessions/ or click on "Visit Site" below.

11:20 AM

Access to Course Materials in the Cohort: Survey Data on Student Purchasing Behaviors

Daniel K. Cortese, Governors State University
Jayne Goode, Governors State University
Erin Grey-Avis, Governors State University
Kerri K. Morris, Governors State University
Chris Tweedle, Governors State University

D1497

11:20 AM - 11:50 AM

Student success is dependent upon having access to tools needed in the classroom. In the fall of 2017, a small group of faculty from various disciplines began meeting to discuss the issue of textbook accessibility on GSU’s campus. We shared various perspectives on potential areas of improvement. The group decided to begin by studying the problem by collecting data on textbook assess in the cohorts.

We have conducted two rounds of data collection. First, we provided a survey to instructors of sophomores in COMS1160 Public Discourse and freshman in ENG1000 in the 11th and 12th week of the Fall 2017 semester. Second, we provided surveys to instructors of freshman in ENG1000 and ENG1010 in week 5 of the Spring 2018 semester. We analyzed the results looking for percentages of students who had the text in some form versus those who did not have access to any text. Our results indicate that an overwhelming percentage of our students do not have access to course materials throughout the semester.

Our discussion will focus on an explanation of the goals of the project, the data collection process, our findings, and our next steps. We hope that this discussion will be enlightening for faculty of every program as they ponder course materials and barriers to access for their students

Finding Fake Facts

Elizabeth M. Shirk, Governors State University

CANCELLED by author

11:20 AM - 11:50 AM

PLEASE NOTE: This program is cancelled.

The internet is filled with an abundance of dishonest, unreliable, and deceptive websites and internet sources. Some of these sources are easily identified as untrustworthy by traditional credibility tests for web page evaluation which consider the accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency and coverage of websites. A growing number of sources, however, appear to pass these inspections despite their dishonest and unreliable content. Unscrupulous authors can now easily build websites to deceive readers into believing false and inaccurate information. To protect people from false information, new methods for testing the credibility of internet sources must be used to supplement traditional methods. Supplemental methods of testing a website’s credibility include fact checking and lateral reading. This presentation will examine traditional methods of testing a website’s credibility, explain how these traditional methods are still necessary foundations for determining a website’s credibility, and describe supplemental methods people must begin to use to distinguish between trustworthy and untrustworthy internet sources.

Religious Pluralism and Change in the Greek Orthodox Church of America

Frances Kostarelos PHD, Governors State University

D34115

11:20 AM - 11:50 AM

This paper examines religious pluralism and change in the Greek Orthodox Church in the United States. The paper begins with a discussion of religious pluralism framed in the Pluralism Project. Themes framed in the Pluralism Project are explored as they relate to shaping the American religious landscape and public discourse on religious life and practice. The presentation concludes with a discussion of the impact of pluralism on Greek Orthodox religious life and institutions in United States in a comparative framework.

The paper draws on symbolic anthropology and is informed by ethnographic and archival research.

The Impact of Governors State University and BESI on a Defined Region of the South Suburban Metropolitan Area

Anthony Paul Andrews, Governors State University

D34005

11:20 AM - 11:50 AM

The university is considered one of the engines of growth in a local economy or its market area, since its direct contributions consist of 1) employment of faculty and staff, 2) services to students, and supply chain links vendors, all of which define the University’s Market area. Indirect contributions consist of those agents associated with the university in terms of community and civic events. Each of these activities represent economic benefits to their host communities and can be classified as the economic impact a university has on its local economy and whose spatial market area includes each of the above agents. In addition are the critical links to the University, which can be considered part of its Demand and Supply chain.

This paper explores how Governors State University (GSU) impacts its local economic area (LEA) and competes with its competitors in wider socio-economic areas. It also investigates how it can increase its impact by forming Public/Private initiatives to enhance its economic revenue in a period of declining state government support. Finally, an Input-Output Model is used to estimate the impact.

The goals of the report are to provide a clear and accurate understanding of the economic impact of GSU and its direct, indirect, and tertiary benefits to its defined local economy and market area. This paper contributes to the field of University Impact Analysis, which is used to substantial the social and economic benefits of a university. We use Census data on Output of Goods and Services, Labor Income on Salaries, Wages and Benefits, Indirect State and Local Taxes, Property Tax Revenue, Population, and Inter-Industry to measure economic impact (Implan, 2016).

12:15 PM

Lunch

GSU Office of the Provost, Governors State University

Hall of Governors - GSU Cafeteria

12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Please visit our student group food vendors in Hall of Governors!

12:30 PM

Poster Session 2

GSU Office of the Provost, Governors State University

Hall of Governors - Governors State University

12:30 PM - 2:00 AM

Please link to Visit Site for Poster Session titles and abstracts below, or go to https://opus.govst.edu/research_day/2018/poster_sessions/

1:10 PM

Interactive Assessment Models in the Classroom

Alli Cipra, Governors State University
Sofie Azmy, Governors State University

D1497

1:10 PM - 1:40 PM

A small pilot study was conducted on the efficacy of interactive assessment models in the classroom. This study evaluated the use of TopHat software in two sections of a general education course. The sections were taught by the same instructor, using the same lecture materials and textbook. Both sections met three times weekly for 50 minute periods. One section was given questions pertaining to the assigned readings prior to the accompanying lecture, while the other session was administered the questions after the accompanying lecture. The purpose of this study was to determine: 1) if students in the pre or post question conditioned performed better on questions related to course content; 2) if test performance was significantly different between the pre and post condition groups; 3) if overall course grade was significantly different between the pre and post condition groups.

Isolation and Characterization of Phthalate-Degrading Bacteria from the Asian Carp Microbiomes and Riverine Sediments

Steven A. Kolb, Governors State University
Timothy Gsell, Governors State University
Edward J. O'Loughlin, Argonne National Laboratory

D1496

1:10 PM - 1:40 PM

Approximately 800 million pounds of phthalates are produced worldwide each year and due to their widespread distribution, phthalates have become ubiquitous in aquatic environments. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) as top priority pollutants due to their pervasive abundance and toxicity. The biodegradation of phthalates has been extensively investigated leading to the discovery of numerous phthalate-degrading bacteria from many types of environments; however there is a lack of studies demonstrating if aquatic organisms can act as a source for isolating phthalate-degrading bacteria. Non-native Asian carp species bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) residing in contaminated environments absorb phthalates into muscle tissue and intake organic pollutants while feeding on plankton and benthic algae. Phthalate-degrading bacteria isolated from the microbiome and scale biofilm of both Asian carp species exhibited similar degradation kinetics to phthalate-degrading bacteria isolated from contaminated riverine sediments. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of phthalate-degrading enrichments inoculated with silver carp microbiomes and riverine sediments shared dominant genera of Pseudomonas. One-way ANOVA test applied to the mean alpha diversity of contaminated sediment and the silver carp microbiome revealed significant differences (PBacillus subtilis strain degrading DEP (1000 mg/L) within 44 hours and a diverse consortium isolated from the silver carp microbiome degrading DMP, DEP, and DBP. The study demonstrates that Asian carp can act as a source for isolating phthalate-degrading bacteria.

Microaggressions: Who, What, Where, and Why.

Elizabeth A. Cottrell, Governors State University
James Werner, Governors State University
Grier Casagrande, Governors State University
Michelle Westergaard, Governors State University
Alli Cipra, Governors State University

D34005

1:10 PM - 1:40 PM

Program description as provided by the author:

5 mins: Introduction. Power point presentation: Definition of: Microaggression with examples of common ones. Privilege with example of common ones.

5 mins: Pictures of several different types of everyday Microaggression are presented with everyone asking to communicate what they are communicating. For example, common facial expression, body language, and questions asked to minority groups.

15 mins: Art activity- Participants can create paper bag puppets that resemble themselves and list common microaggression they experience.

5 mins: Debriefing. Review of what was shared and experienced by all participants. Along with tips on how to become more conscience of everyday microaggressions.

"Why Do We Need More Haitians?": America's History of Suppressing Immigrants of Color and Favoritism of European Immigrants from 1819 to 2018

Aleigh Crowder, Governors State University

D34115

1:10 PM - 1:40 PM

In a country championed for its premise of “the dream” and nicknamed “the melting pot,” America’s history is riddled with examples of race as a determiner of entry. President Donald Trump’s recent statements about Haitians and African immigrants reflect this sentiment. The Trump administration’s attempts at imposing executive order 13769, repealing DACA, ending temporary protected status for several groups, and refusing low-skilled work visas to Haitians, Samoans, and Belizeans contradict what our country claims to value. The polarity of this value has always existed; evident from the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 to the National Origins Act in 1924. From legislation created to discriminate against different racial groups to the American attitudes towards immigrants of color. When there’s talk about keeping immigrants out, those immigrants are usually of color. Examining immigration legislation proposed from 1819 to 2018, I assert that it has contributed to the preference shown towards white immigrants and the restriction of immigrants of color.

1:50 PM

Making Oakland the Healthiest City in America

Brittnee Harris, Governors State University
Lisa Purdy, Governors State University

D1497

1:50 PM - 2:20 PM

Program description as provided by author:

As consultants for Oakland we were charged with developing a program driven by community needs and coordinating local resources to address key priorities in Oakland. We were required to develop partnerships to advance the triple aim while determining the determinants of health.

Social Perception and Alcohol Use

Darrin Aase, Governors State University

D1496

1:50 PM - 2:20 PM

Social perception encompasses a variety of verbal and nonverbal social information processing skills involving fronto-limbic systems that may be dysfunctional among individuals with AUD. When compared to normative samples or comparison groups, individuals with AUD have demonstrated deficits in facial emotion recognition (FER; e.g., Oscar-Berman et al., 2014). Recent meta-analyses (Bora & Zorlu, 2016; Castellano et al., 2014) have found moderate effect sizes demonstrating impairment in FER in AUD (d=.65 and .67, respectively). Additionally, large effect sizes for social perception tasks have also been observed among individuals with PTSD (Plana et al., 2014). However, the majority of the cross-sectional studies of social perception in AUD have excluded individuals with other psychiatric comorbidities such as PTSD, which is highly comorbid with AUD and may influence social perception ability in comorbid samples (Gorka et al., 2016). In this presentation, data from two GSU University Research Grant projects will be presented that further our understanding of FER in AUD and comorbid disorders.

2:00 PM

Genomic Diversity of Peromyscus leucopus within the Chicago Region

Snehal Chavda, Governors State University

D34115

2:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Program description, as provided by the author:

The white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) often shows a positive relationship between population density and fragmentation. Severe habitat fragmentation creates geographical barriers, which concurrently serve as dispersal barriers for those populations residing within the heterogeneous landscape. Furthermore, variation in discharge of pollutants in urban ecosystems, compared to that of agriculture and rural ecosystems, exerts unique selective pressures on local populations. To study the effects of evolutionary section due habitat fragmentation and environmental stressors on this ubiquitous species, P. leucopus were live trapped along an urban-rural gradient in the Chicago region. Twenty-eight locations were selected from four landscape types within the greater Chicago area: (1) urban (2) suburban, (3) agriculture, and (4) macrosite. This selection procedure broadly identified an area proceeding south of downtown Chicago, then west, as maximizing the diversity of land coverages along the gradient. These sites were all standardized on oak woodlands. Approximately 600 unique individuals were sampled during 2014 to 2017 and a 2-mm tissue sample collected to analyze genetic variation along the 70-km gradient. DNA was isolated using QAmp Blood and Tissue Kit following manufacturer’s protocol. A melting curve was established using a temperature gradient Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay. Based on the results from the melting curve assay, 12 individual PCR assays were established. Currently, preliminary work on genomic analysis of each individual sample is under way at the Pritzker Laboratory at the Field Museum of Natural History. This will involve estimates of genetic isolation among different field sites.

Stepping Stones and Stumbling Blocks: Reflections on Service Learning/Community Engagement in First Year Writing Pedagogy

Bradley Smith, Governors State University
Amanda Athon, Governors State University
Robin Thompson, Governors State University
Amy Vujaklija, Governors State University
Laura White, Governors State University
Kerri K. Morris, Governors State University

D34005

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This roundtable discussion features the reflections of faculty teaching ENGL 1010: Writing Studies 2, who are participating in a grant sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) to implement high-impact practices in the first year of college. The goal of this session will be to reflect on service learning/community engagement more generally, and our hope is that it will be informative to a diverse audience of teachers who might wish to implement similar pedagogies in their own classes.

2:30 PM

Gender Differences in the Utilization of Transformational Leadership by Community College Senior Administrators

Alexandrea L. Horton, Governors State University
Crystal Cleggett, Governors State University
Matthew Cooney, Governors State University

D1496

2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

As enrollment of more women than men in higher education rises, more equitable representation of the women in higher education administrative positions is necessary. This is especially important in community colleges as the impending retirements of over 90% of current community college presidents is an opportune time to diversify the community college presidency. The purpose of this study is to examine the personal and professional characteristics of men and women senior community college leaders and how these leaders utilize transformational leadership. The researchers used a demographic questionnaire to collect information on the personal, professional, and educational backgrounds of senior community college leaders and the Leadership Practices Inventory-SELF to measure transformational leadership. Researchers electronically distributed 2,711 surveys to senior community college administrators and received 656 useable responses. Results yielded that there were differences in self-reported utilization of transformational leadership practices between men and women. Furthermore, the results suggested differences in participation in professional development opportunities and graduate education. The researchers hope to utilize this information to further advocate for equitable practices in developing senior community college leaders.

The Body, Environment, Mind, and Spirit (BEMS) Pathway of Addiction Causality and Curative Interventions

John Akinshola Akinbote, Governors State University
Cheryl L. Mejta, Governors State University

D1497

2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

It remains a great puzzle as various etiological approaches to addiction problems or disorders have continued to generate interesting controversies amidst their valuable or plausible inputs to the management of cases over the years. More perplexing, is that, while some models or theories are rigidly in adherence to or are outgrowth ideas of the traditional medical (disease) and moral models, some newer models emphasized the combinations or interrelationships in the context of these rudimentary models without yet, a universally acceptable causality. A foremost addiction counselor, Todd Lewis, in his book Substance Abuse and Addiction Treatment (2014), emphasized this acceptability gap in causation despite the rich array of etiological theories in the addiction field by quoting by quoting Doweiko; "Research has supported both genetic predisposition and learning components in the onset of addiction, yet a grand, unifying theory has yet to emerge." (Doweiko,2009).

This is the catapulting challenge that has ignited the need to develop a near perfectly acceptable and holistic pathway or cycle rather than a static model that cannot clearly explain the complex system of addiction causation as well as providing result oriented therapeutic strategies.

The current study aims to use a systemic Ground Theory (GT) research methodology to develop an all-inclusive and functional pathway of addiction causation, without negating an insightful provision for treatments, culture, ethnicity, gender and racial variations (variables) based on the Body-Environment-Mind-Spirit model of disease causation and treatment.

Using the Straussian GT approach, measures will be analytically set out to inductively arrive at an all-encompassing pathway for addiction causation and treatment. This will be carried out using 6 standard standalone search engines (to avoid repetitions), 2 each from medical, psychological and sociological fields. Using balloting, 2 will be randomly picked from a list of 6 search engines in each field. They will be used to collate data and corroborate information about addiction and other variables that will be manually analyzed, categorize and directed towards a pathway since this technique allows for the researchers' continuous input based on their cumulative experience, knowledge and intuitive skills in the course of the data analysis and conclusions.

3:00 PM

Alternative Spring Break: Port Arthur, Texas

Leahjean Frazier Dixon, Governors State University
Sean Smith, Governors State University
Cristal Avila, Governors State University
Sachen Emory, Governors State University
Lester van Moody, Governors State University
Marshawn Moore, Governors State University
Marie Penney, Governors State University
Joy Thomas, Governors State University

D1496

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Alternative Spring Break is an experiential learning opportunity that allows students to apply their academic education to assist in eradicating social issues. This project investigates the impact of service-learning and best practices in community recovery after a natural disaster and the functionality of the collaborating. The project also serves as a contribution to the discussion of integrating insightful reflection to the service process and making it accessible for the students to put their knowledge into practice for the benefit of the community in everyday life. The research will focus on the Golden Triangle which was impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

4:00 PM

Poster Session 3

GSU Office of the Provost, Governors State University

Hall of Governors - Governors State University

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Titles and abstracts of posters can be found on the Poster Session track at https://opus.govst.edu/research_day/2018/poster_sessions/ or click "Visit Site" below.