Poster Sessions - 2018 Research Day

Event Title

Inside to Outside: A Collaborative Effort to Address Cancer Disparities among Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Populations

Location

Hall of Governors

Start Date

4-6-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-6-2018 12:00 PM

Abstract

Inmates experience higher rates of serious and chronic illness. Among the chronic illnesses experienced by this population is the diagnosis of cancer. During the past decade the incidence of cancer has slowly but steadily increased. One explanation for this increase in cancer diagnosis in correctional populations is the aging of the population. However, cancer diagnosis is not only evident in the aging inmate population (65 or older) but there is evidence of a younger population (30-45) presenting with cancer at intake or receiving a cancer diagnosis within months of admission to our jails and prisons. The consistent increase in patients with or diagnosis with cancer suggest a need to explore strategies to successfully manage and provide care meeting best practice standards for this special population. The increase in patients with a diagnosis of cancer further suggests a need to develop policies that decrease the risk of cancer disparities in the inmate population and among formerly incarcerated persons. Ensuring access to quality of care and continuity of care for patients with cancer requires health professionals to be vigilant in screening, health promotion, prevention and treatment. Presenters will discuss approaches to care and treatment and policy implications for this population.

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Support provided through the GUIDE (GSU & UIC P20 Grant).

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Apr 6th, 10:30 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Inside to Outside: A Collaborative Effort to Address Cancer Disparities among Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Populations

Hall of Governors

Inmates experience higher rates of serious and chronic illness. Among the chronic illnesses experienced by this population is the diagnosis of cancer. During the past decade the incidence of cancer has slowly but steadily increased. One explanation for this increase in cancer diagnosis in correctional populations is the aging of the population. However, cancer diagnosis is not only evident in the aging inmate population (65 or older) but there is evidence of a younger population (30-45) presenting with cancer at intake or receiving a cancer diagnosis within months of admission to our jails and prisons. The consistent increase in patients with or diagnosis with cancer suggest a need to explore strategies to successfully manage and provide care meeting best practice standards for this special population. The increase in patients with a diagnosis of cancer further suggests a need to develop policies that decrease the risk of cancer disparities in the inmate population and among formerly incarcerated persons. Ensuring access to quality of care and continuity of care for patients with cancer requires health professionals to be vigilant in screening, health promotion, prevention and treatment. Presenters will discuss approaches to care and treatment and policy implications for this population.