April 7 - Wednesday

Event Title

Soil aggregate fractions and soil aggregate stability in old-growth forests of Huron Mountain, Michigan

Start Date

4-7-2021 3:00 PM

End Date

4-7-2021 3:30 PM

Abstract

Soil aggregates are the basic units of soil structure that regulate the dynamics of soil organic carbon and nutrient cycling, sustain soil fertility and resists erosion and degradation. In this study, characteristics of soil aggregation were investigated in three old-growth forest types in Huron Mountain, Michigan. Soil samples were divided into four aggregate size fractions: >1, 0.25-1, 0.053-0.25 and A. saccharum, 82.2% in T. Canadensis to 86.5% in Tsuga dominance forests. The ratio of macroaggregates to microaggregates was significantly higher in Tsuga dominance forests (7.0) and T. Canadensis forests (6.9) than that in A. saccharum (3.0). Considering the similar environmental conditions in the study site, the differences of soil aggregate fractions were mainly attributed to the litter quality and quantity, soil microbial community, and fauna activity in these forests, highlighting the necessity of conducting further research on mechanisms of soil aggregation in the study region for maintaining ecosystem functions.

Identify Grant

This project was financially supported by a 2018-19 GSU Center for the Junior Year Grant.

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Apr 7th, 3:00 PM Apr 7th, 3:30 PM

Soil aggregate fractions and soil aggregate stability in old-growth forests of Huron Mountain, Michigan

Soil aggregates are the basic units of soil structure that regulate the dynamics of soil organic carbon and nutrient cycling, sustain soil fertility and resists erosion and degradation. In this study, characteristics of soil aggregation were investigated in three old-growth forest types in Huron Mountain, Michigan. Soil samples were divided into four aggregate size fractions: >1, 0.25-1, 0.053-0.25 and A. saccharum, 82.2% in T. Canadensis to 86.5% in Tsuga dominance forests. The ratio of macroaggregates to microaggregates was significantly higher in Tsuga dominance forests (7.0) and T. Canadensis forests (6.9) than that in A. saccharum (3.0). Considering the similar environmental conditions in the study site, the differences of soil aggregate fractions were mainly attributed to the litter quality and quantity, soil microbial community, and fauna activity in these forests, highlighting the necessity of conducting further research on mechanisms of soil aggregation in the study region for maintaining ecosystem functions.