Socioeconomic Disparities in Electronic Cigarette Use among Adult Smokers: Evidence from Tobacco Use Supplement to Current Population Survey in the U.S.

Location

D34011

Start Date

3-31-2023 10:30 AM

End Date

3-31-2023 11:30 AM

Other Presentation Disciplines:

Health Behaviors
Substance Abuse
Health Equity
Tobacco Control

Abstract

Background: Electronic nicotine delivery systems, commonly known as e-cigarettes (ECs), were the most commonly used nicotine products in the U.S., next to combustible cigarettes. While health consequences of long-term EC use are largely unknown, expert opinion regards ECs may aid smoking cessation as ECs believed to be substantially less harmful than combustible cigarettes. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that (1) socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with higher chance of cigarette smoking; (2) socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with lower chance of EC use. Methods: Data are from Tobacco Use Supplements to Current Population Survey 2014/2015, 2018/2019. We applied logit models to estimate the associations of social determinants (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, education, income, employment status, and residential locations) on cigarette and EC use. Furthermore, we studied the associations of social determinants and complete switching to ECs among those who solely used cigarettes in the previous year, and complete switching to cigarettes among those who solely used ECs in the previous year Results: Preliminary findings suggested that higher proportion of exclusive cigarette smokers are those with lower income, lower education, and African American subgroups, whereas higher proportion of exclusive EC users are those with higher income, higher education, and White subgroups. Furthermore, we found that socioeconomic disadvantaged (advantaged) groups are more likely switch to cigarette use only (EC use only) among those who solely used EC (cigarettes) in the previous year. Conclusion: The differential patterns of cigarette and EC use among socioeconomic disadvantaged subgroups raised health equity concerns, as such patterns may exacerbate socioeconomic disparities in smoking-related morbidity and mortality.

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Mar 31st, 10:30 AM Mar 31st, 11:30 AM

Socioeconomic Disparities in Electronic Cigarette Use among Adult Smokers: Evidence from Tobacco Use Supplement to Current Population Survey in the U.S.

D34011

Background: Electronic nicotine delivery systems, commonly known as e-cigarettes (ECs), were the most commonly used nicotine products in the U.S., next to combustible cigarettes. While health consequences of long-term EC use are largely unknown, expert opinion regards ECs may aid smoking cessation as ECs believed to be substantially less harmful than combustible cigarettes. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that (1) socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with higher chance of cigarette smoking; (2) socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with lower chance of EC use. Methods: Data are from Tobacco Use Supplements to Current Population Survey 2014/2015, 2018/2019. We applied logit models to estimate the associations of social determinants (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, education, income, employment status, and residential locations) on cigarette and EC use. Furthermore, we studied the associations of social determinants and complete switching to ECs among those who solely used cigarettes in the previous year, and complete switching to cigarettes among those who solely used ECs in the previous year Results: Preliminary findings suggested that higher proportion of exclusive cigarette smokers are those with lower income, lower education, and African American subgroups, whereas higher proportion of exclusive EC users are those with higher income, higher education, and White subgroups. Furthermore, we found that socioeconomic disadvantaged (advantaged) groups are more likely switch to cigarette use only (EC use only) among those who solely used EC (cigarettes) in the previous year. Conclusion: The differential patterns of cigarette and EC use among socioeconomic disadvantaged subgroups raised health equity concerns, as such patterns may exacerbate socioeconomic disparities in smoking-related morbidity and mortality.