Research Days 2023 Poster Sessions

Location

GSU Library

Start Date

3-31-2023 11:45 AM

End Date

3-31-2023 1:15 PM

Description of Program

Prior work suggests that mindfulness decreases negative rumination (Blanke et. al., 2020) and creates an atmosphere of acceptance and self-understanding in our mind (Grund et. al., 2021). In this study we explored how mindfulness led to a change in the amount of regret experienced on both cognitive and emotional levels.

Abstract

Regret has been found to be associated with anxiety, depression, and cognitive distortions (Markman et al., 2009; Markham & Miller, 2006). In relation to regret, past actions and decisions create painful experiences resulting in negative rumination (Olatunji et al., 2013). However, if the negative rumination is reduced there is the potential to learn important feedback from previous decisions that have resulted in painful experiences. Thus, the current research explores the mitigating role of mindfulness on the amount of regret experienced. It was hypothesized that the participants would report experiencing less amount of regret following mindfulness meditation. First, participants were asked to recall a regretful life event and asked to rate the intensity of emotions they experience, including regret. Keeping the memory in mind, all the participants then participated in a guided mindfulness session. Following the mindfulness session, participants were asked to re-evaluate the memory they recalled by completing post self-report ratings as well as the short version of 12 item 5-Facet Scale (Baer et al., 2006) and 12 item Self Compassion Scale (Neff, 2019). Participants were instructed to practice the same medication at least twice for a week using audio recording provided by the investigators. Secondly, one week later, phone interviews were conducted. Eight students participated in the current study for a partial course credit. Quantitative analysis revealed that participants reported experiencing significantly less amount of regret following guided meditation. Results suggest that 75% of the participants were able to process their regretful experiences and have a better understanding of self-acceptance.

Faculty / Staff Sponsor

Figen Karadgon, Ph.D.

Presentation File

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Mar 31st, 11:45 AM Mar 31st, 1:15 PM

The Effects of Mindfulness on Regret: An Explorative Analysis

GSU Library

Regret has been found to be associated with anxiety, depression, and cognitive distortions (Markman et al., 2009; Markham & Miller, 2006). In relation to regret, past actions and decisions create painful experiences resulting in negative rumination (Olatunji et al., 2013). However, if the negative rumination is reduced there is the potential to learn important feedback from previous decisions that have resulted in painful experiences. Thus, the current research explores the mitigating role of mindfulness on the amount of regret experienced. It was hypothesized that the participants would report experiencing less amount of regret following mindfulness meditation. First, participants were asked to recall a regretful life event and asked to rate the intensity of emotions they experience, including regret. Keeping the memory in mind, all the participants then participated in a guided mindfulness session. Following the mindfulness session, participants were asked to re-evaluate the memory they recalled by completing post self-report ratings as well as the short version of 12 item 5-Facet Scale (Baer et al., 2006) and 12 item Self Compassion Scale (Neff, 2019). Participants were instructed to practice the same medication at least twice for a week using audio recording provided by the investigators. Secondly, one week later, phone interviews were conducted. Eight students participated in the current study for a partial course credit. Quantitative analysis revealed that participants reported experiencing significantly less amount of regret following guided meditation. Results suggest that 75% of the participants were able to process their regretful experiences and have a better understanding of self-acceptance.